Study Disproves GOP’s Only Economic Plan »« Texas Purges Living People From Voter Rolls

Legislators Praise Scientology

Last week the “Church” of Scientology opened a new national office in Washington, DC and managed to get several members of Congress and executive agencies, from both parties, to show up and sing the praises of the “church.” And there’s a familiar name on the list:

Lawmakers in attendance were Texas Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Indiana Republican Rep. Dan Burton and Illinois Democratic Rep. Danny Davis. Liz Gibson, Senior Program Manager at the Federal Emergency Management Agency was also in attendance.

You’d have to be a longtime reader of this blog and have a really good memory to recall that Danny Davis was also the guy who helped crown Rev. Moon the “king of peace” in a bizarre ceremony in a Senate office building back in 2004. At an event with a couple dozen legislators and government officials in attendance, it was Davis who actually put on white gloves, carried a crown on a silk pillow and placed it on the Rev. Moon’s head. John Gorenfeld has the details here. So now Davis has apparently gone from praising one religious fraud to another. And he wasn’t alone:

Jackson Lee applauded the organization.

“I want to thank L. Ron Hubbard for recognizing that courage is not rewarded but it is valued,” said the congresswoman. L. Ron Hubbard was the church’s founder.

“And to be able to have the wonderment of people coming together and ensuring that people come together for peace. That’s what I see in the Church, that you have come together for peace. I welcome and support that,” she said.

Burton and Davis lauded the church’s efforts in pushing Congress to pass legislation targeted toward child medication and the criminal justice system. Gibson praised the disaster relief the Church of Scientology has provided in times of crisis.

Well that’s a bit of a skewed picture, don’t you think? This new office is right by the former office of AINN. I used to walk past it often when I was in DC.

Comments

  1. says

    Why the quotes round church. Can’t see that there is any noticeable difference from all the other “churches”. It’s merely a bit younger and a bit (very little bit) viler.

  2. says

    This whole “coming together for peace” mantra is nothing but a fraud, both for $cientology and for the Unification Church. The latter have been droning on an on about “peace” since the 1970s. Did either of these churches, or any of their front organizations, campaign against the Iraq or Afghan wars? Did they campaign against ANY significant aggressive move by the US or any other nation? Did they ever campaign against the anti-Muslim bigotry that’s got the US such a bad name abroad? Of course not — the Moonies, in fact, spent a lot of time and effort supporting Republican neocons in their campaign to ramp up US military power to fight the USSR (and their liberal critics) and win any war we might get into with them; and Moon was last seen supporting the North Korean regime — you know, those wonderful peace-loving folks who want to get their own nuclear bomb and recently shelled a town with in South Korea with absolutely no provocation.

  3. Nick Gotts (formerly KG) says

    I’m flabbergasted. Indeed, seldom has my flabber been so completely gasted. Presumably they were either paid large sums of money, or simply consider that believing any load of ludicrous and mendacious nonsense, and bilking vulnerable people out of large sums of money in its service, is a virtue.

  4. slc1 says

    I must say that I am extremely disappointed in Congresswoman Lee. I have watched several interviews with her and she seemed to be one of the more intelligent members of Congress.

  5. Stevarious says

    Gibson praised the disaster relief the Church of Scientology has provided in times of crisis.

    Then either Gibson knows absolutely nothing about how the Scientologists “provide” “disaster relief”, or he is entirely incapable of being honest.

    These people do not go to disaster sites to help or provide aid. They go to prey on people when they are most vulnerable. Of course, all religions do that to some degree or another – but the Scientologists are the most blatantly obvious about it.

  6. Randomfactor says

    Scientology is the country’s official religion. It enjoys protections available to no other religion in the nation.

    And why the FUCK does Davis still have his seat? Or his government job?

  7. Reginald Selkirk says

    d cwilson #3: I think it’s time for Danny Davis’s family to hold an intervention. He needs help.

    A few sessions of “auditing” ought to straighten him out.

  8. Pierce R. Butler says

    Stevarious @ # 9: These people do not go to disaster sites to help or provide aid.

    Don’t be too sure about that.

    After the big earthquake in Haiti, a Registered Nurse friend of mine, experienced in disaster relief work, somehow hitched a ride to Port-au-Prince on a Scientologeek plane – so they have indeed provided some useful service where and when needed.

  9. Michael Heath says

    lofgren writes:

    But scientology is not a religion! (except at tax season)

    Part of scientology’s scam, as hinted at in its name, is that it’s a technologically-friendly approach to optimizing your well-being. That claim is then followed by a bunch of babble dressed-up as if it came from a propeller-head with a clue.

    I always wondered if this rhetorical approach is where Bill Dembski got the idea to market intelligent design creationism in the same manner, especially prior to his subsequently attempting to tie it to biblical passages attributed to John which asserts Jesus is ‘the word’.

  10. Stevarious says

    After the big earthquake in Haiti, a Registered Nurse friend of mine, experienced in disaster relief work, somehow hitched a ride to Port-au-Prince on a Scientologeek plane – so they have indeed provided some useful service where and when needed.

    Check the link I provided. There is no doubt that they go to disasters. The question is whether they are actually providing a useful service when they get there.

    Or there are stories like this, where the Scientologists just gives a ride to a bunch of doctors and aid workers (who have nothing to do with Scientology) to a disaster site, then claim credit for the help given. (Your friend ‘somehow hitch(ing) a ride’ is a feature, not a bug.)

    Like most religions, the rank-and-file are utterly clueless, while the management is conniving and devious.

  11. typecaster says

    As most people know, Hubbard was a science-fiction writer. For this reason, the early Scientologists thought that they could easily recruit new members at science-fiction conventions.

    That stopped after they kept getting responses similar to “Go away. We knew L. Ron when he was a small time thief.”

  12. says

    That stopped after they kept getting responses similar to “Go away. We knew L. Ron when he was a small time thief.”

    …followed perhaps by “Let me know when [insert better author’s name here] forms a cult, and I’ll think about it.”

  13. says

    Or there are stories like this, where the Scientologists just gives a ride to a bunch of doctors and aid workers…

    Or there’s another story about a bunch of $cientologists who somehow managed to get a ride on a transport plane with a bunch of medical equipment and other supplies…so the medical personnel who were supposed to go alolng with, and actually use, said supplies, got bumped and left behind, so they were stuck at home and their supplies were sitting unused in Haiti.

    Oh, and those $cientology wankers had to be fed and housed while they were there pretending to help the hungry and homeless natives. I guess that’s the kind of necessary response to disaster that Tom Cruise was going on about.

  14. harryweinstein says

    Doesn’t the constitution say something about the government not being allowed to grant titles of nobility?

  15. says

    I am curious that no one has yet to comment on another name on the list, Dan Burton, long known as quackery’s best friend in Congress – he has a long file on quackwatch, for instance (though how scary it is may be mitigated by the fact that he is, apparently, not seeking reelection).

  16. says

    Ed:

    Reptilicanism IS a “Big tent” sorta org. How they gonna their inclusiversity iffen they don’t ask some non-mainstream whackjob cult to join in with allathe mainstream whackjob cults? ‘sides, somebody’s gotta pick up the slack now that Messiah Moon has decided to concentrate on being dead.

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply