Bachmann’s Bizarre Argument for Romney »« Priest Blames Victims for Molestation

Egads! A Non-Christian Prayer at the RNC!

The wingnuts have a new shiny object to throw a temper tantrum about, as a Sikh — a genuine non-white non-Christian — was allowed to give a prayer at the Republican National Convention. Janet Mefferd predictably clutches her pearls:

This adds new spin to my view of what’s going on at the RNC right now because you still hear a little bit of talk God here and there, but it’s different. When Mitt Romney talks about God, he’s not talking about our God and he has yet to give his speech yet.

But we now have a party that is allowing people to pray at the Republican National Convention who don’t have the slightest similarity to us, when it comes to our view of God, at all. At all.

It wasn’t that long ago that Pat Buchanan at the 1992 RNC was talking about the great culture war and being a Judeo-Christian nation and how important it was to hold that all together because that was the foundation upon which our country was built. And he was right. He got skewered for it, but he was right.

And look how far we’ve come. Now, 2012 we have somebody from an Eastern religion offering the invocation at the Republican National Convention. I’m not saying people from different religions can’t vote Republican, but what this really is is a syncretism that is kind of seeping under the door like a gas.

And Bryan Fischer said that Christians at the convention should “be respectful, but not bow their heads…to a different god.” Fair enough. But now you know how we all feel when you guys want us to sit by while you talk to your imaginary friend.

Comments

  1. raven says

    When Mitt Romney talks about God, he’s not talking about our God and he has yet to give his speech yet.

    That is true.

    The fundie xians have set it up so that they may elect the first nonxian president in a long time. 3/4 of all priests and ministers and 1/2 of all xians, don’t consider the Mormons xians.

    I blame it on fundie xian induced cognitive impairment. Perry, Bachmann, Satanorum, and Cain were just too dumb and crazy to be nominated.

    All the Mormon hating xians have gotten real quiet all the sudden. The Southern Baptists have an official position on Mormonism, that it is a false religion and they are all going to hell. They seem to have forgotten that and are hoping no one remembers what they’ve been saying for decades.

  2. blf says

    At least she didn’t appear to confuse Sikhs with Muslims.

    But she is quoted as saying:

    being a Judeo-Christian nation … was the foundation upon which our country was built.

    Uh, no.

    She’s also quoted as saying:

    When Mitt Romney talks about God, he’s not talking about our God…

    Do I detect hints of unease there with RMoney’s own batshite crazy cult?

  3. Michael Heath says

    Like many of us, I’m expected to respectfully tolerate mini-sermons to the audience prayer when Christians are in the room. It is considered divisive and a failure in character for those who don’t agree to these sermons posing as prayer to respond; instead we’re expected to keep our mouths shut. Any dissent has accusations of us being divisive with those who agree with the sermon prayer the unfair victims of our supposedly intolerant dissent. I’ve quietly tolerated this infringement on my rights now for 30+ years; I assume many in this forum do the same.

    Recently it’s becoming increasingly difficult for me to keep my mouth shut. I’m not sure how much longer I can bear hearing how much God loves all humans, the very god who these Christians believe will be sending many humans to unimaginable suffering for infinity. Any advice on how I can better ‘carry this cross’ (snark) would be welcomed.

  4. Quodlibet says

    OK, I had to look up “syncretism.” (wikipedia: “the combining of different (often contradictory) beliefs, often while melding practices of various schools of thought”). I don’t think that’s what she really means; at best, there is stiff-backed barely-tolerated ok-if-we-have to inclusion of Others, but there is not any melding of belief as far as I can see.

    But what caught my attention was that I initially mis-read the word as “syncretinism” – and yep, that’s sure what I see going on in the republican party.

  5. jws1 says

    Heath: Do what you always do – be cold and honest, and well in control of emotions without being devoid of them. They hate calm, disciplined, reasoned dissent; it’s much easier for them to be confronted by rabid hand-waving.

  6. says

    Why those uppity atheists Christians! Don’t they know it’s part of our culture to pray to Almighty God the omnipresent Onkar* before a meeting? Why can’t they just shut the hell up and keep quiet while we’re busy calling on Jesus Sri Guru Granth Sahib? It’s not like listening to the prayer makes them into Christians Sikhs. They need to show some respect or they’re next.

    *Full disclosure, I had to make a trip to Wikipedia to learn about Sikhism for this post.

  7. raven says

    OK, I had to look up “syncretism.”

    A lot of religions are syncretic.

    Xianity started out as Judaism combined with middle east Paganism, plus Roman and Greek philosophy, and probably some new material that they just made up.

    The fundies have added right wing extremist politics to the mix. The Catholics added the Pope and magician priests.

  8. regexp says

    talking about the great culture war

    Its not just the “culture war” now – its now the “great culture war”. Awesome.

  9. baal says

    The RNC convention did an ok job of getting non-wasps at the podium to give speeches – down right made them look semi-normal. Of course, you’d have to overlook the detail that non-white speakers out numbered the non-white delegate count.

  10. roggg says

    I’m not saying people from different religions can’t vote Republican…

    This….this cracks me up. “I’m not saying heathen minorities cant help put a christian theocracy in place, as long as they’re those self-hating minorities that admire us and are glad to submit to our rule.”

  11. Ben P says

    Xianity started out as Judaism combined with middle east Paganism, plus Roman and Greek philosophy, and probably some new material that they just made up.

    I was going to say, Christmas is a good example of syncretism. It’s been so wholly absorbed into mainstream Christianity that Christan leaders un-ironically defend Christmas and call for a return to its spiritual roots in contrast to the commercialized thing it has become.

    In reality, there’s little evidence of Jesus being born on December 25th and Christmas was not recognized as a holiday at all until the late 300’s or 400 AD. And some evidence that the earliest Christians rejected any such thing on the basis that worshipping birthdays was the sort of thing emperors did to deify themselves. Early Christians did celebrate Epiphany, which was the baptism of Jesus, occuring on January 6th.

    On the other hand, the Roman Festival Sol Invictus fell on December 25th, and most of the traditions we associate with Christmas come either from Saturnalia (gift giving), Roman New Year (gift giving, candles, Christmas wreaths) or Germanic festivals celebrating the winter solstice, most notably Yule. (the use of evergreens as decoration, feasting).

    During the middle ages Christmas was often a wild celebration and was itself condemned by conservative religious figures of its day. By the Reformation, many conservative puritans (including those that came to the US) rejected Christmas altogether. Celebration of christmas was actually banned in boston for 20 years in the late 17th century. Christmas in the US survived primarily because of German immigrants who celebrated the holiday more openly. It wasn’t until the mid 1800’s that Christmas began to become popular in the US.

  12. d cwilson says

    Am I the only one who finds their use of the term “Judeo-Christian” to be really disingenuous? All it is is a sop to disguise the fact that Jews are just further down their “convert or die” list than say, atheists or Muslims.

  13. bksea says

    I’m with d cwilson on the whole “Judeo-Christian” thing. I’ve always assumed it is all about pandering to the pro-Israel crowd.

  14. Chiroptera says

    I’m not saying people from different religions can’t vote Republican, but….

    Yeah, nothing guarantees electoral success quite like letting significant numbers of people know that they just aren’t welcome in your party.

  15. eric says

    They have a religious requirement to carry arms and have historically fought muslims. In hindsight, I’m amazed the GOP took this long to decide to use them as poster-boys for their version of religious pluralism.

  16. Michael Heath says

    bksea writes:

    I’m with d cwilson on the whole “Judeo-Christian” thing. I’ve always assumed it is all about pandering to the pro-Israel crowd.

    I think it’s partly motivated by that now. But that’s a relatively recent observation, no more than 10 years, which post-dates the popular use of this term. I didn’t really notice its pervasive usage in the framework of Israel until Sarah Palin came on the scene. I’ve long speculated the original motivation was to promote Christianist policy prescriptions while falsely posing those prescriptions and promoters as merely promoting ideas grounded in (secular) Western Civilization.

  17. slc1 says

    Re BenP @ #14

    As I understand it, December 25 was chosen as the birth date of Yeshua of Nazareth because that would make Jan. 1 the date of his circumcision. Of course, all of this occurred under the Julian calender. Had there been some consistency when the Gregorian calender was adopted, the date of birth and the date of circumcision should have been changed to accommodate the difference between the two calenders, which apparently differ by 10 days.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calender

  18. John Hinkle says

    But we now have a party that is allowing people to pray at the Republican National Convention who don’t have the slightest similarity to us…

    What is it?

    Christian denomination?

    No, not really… well maybe…

    Political affiliation?

    Well, no… they claim to be one of us… sort of…

    Skin color?

    Well yeah, but that’s obvious…

    Gender?

    What, female prayer doesn’t count! Duh!

    Bank balance?

    No one would presume to impersonate the righteous!

    So… who else has a similarity to “us”?

  19. Crudely Wrott says

    But we now have a party that is allowing people to pray at the Republican National Convention who don’t have the slightest similarity to us, when it comes to our view of God, at all. At all.

    Them! THEM!!!

    [/ 1950’s Sci Fi movie soundtrack]

  20. Pieter B, FCD says

    baal @12

    non-white speakers outnumbered the non-white delegate count.

    Molly Ivins on the 2000 GOP convention:

    To the stage managers: Next time, watch out for that going-overboard-on-the diversity stuff. Although the stage looked like a Motown reunion, when the cameras panned around the hall, it was “American Gothic” on Maalox. Contrast too painful.

  21. dingojack says

    SLC – in fact changing to the Gregorian calendar required shifting forward ten days (or more) to line up the equinoxes.
    The period between 25 Dec (a.d VIII Kal. Ian./Solis Invictus/Winter Solstice) and 1 Jan (Kal. Ian./Roman Civil New Year) remained the same, eight days (inclusive) or a Roman market week.
    Dingo

  22. kermit. says

    I’m not saying people from different religions can’t vote Republican…

    but I am saying that they wouldn’t have any sane reason to want to.

  23. ci50158 says

    And this is why we have separation of church and state. I’m seriously distressed that people like this don’t see the evidence of the danger of mixing religion and politics when it’s right in front of them, effecting them directly.

Leave a Reply