‘Psychics’ Give Tips on Missing Girls


Two young girls from Evansdale, Iowa have disappeared and the people in that area are searching far and wide to find them. The local sheriff’s department have been looking for more than two weeks and there’s a $50,000 reward being offered. But they’re getting exactly the wrong kind of “help” from dozens of ‘psychics.’

Deputies say they’ve taken 80 tips from psychic mediums claiming to know the girls location.

“They are all giving their opinion,” Chief Deputy Rick Abben said, “No two are having the same vision I guess you could say.”

Laura Henderson is a self-professed psychic from Cedar Rapids. She says it’s common for mediums to get involved in a missing persons cases.

“No psychic can answer every question,” Henderson explains, “Certainly you can get impressions, if someone’s alive their energy comes across stronger and feels different to a psychic in terms of how it comes across.”

In other words, it’s completely useless. And if one of those ‘psychics’ is even in the ballpark, that will be hailed as proof of their ‘psychic’ power; the 79 misses will be deemed irrelevant.

Comments

  1. beezlebubby says

    Is there no heartache or tragedy so sacrosanct that some charlatan (or a few scores of them) won’t try to profit from? I wish I was one of the staff on the police department fielding those calls. Since police apparently can’t be fired for seriously egregious acts against citizens, I assume my job would be safe for merely telling frauds to go f*** themselves.

  2. says

    And if one of those ‘psychics’ is even in the ballpark, that will be hailed as proof of their ‘psychic’ power;

    And it’s a big ballpark, usually. “They are near water” passes for information among these types.

  3. John Hinkle says

    if someone’s alive their energy comes across stronger and feels different to a psychic in terms of how it comes across.

    Comes across like empty fluff to me.

  4. jakc says

    Reminds me of a thriller from the 70s where the psychic is the killer (or at least a suspect). Start interrogating psychics with “useful” information, maybe they will stop coming forward.

  5. Stevarious says

    Unfortunately, it’s also a very lucrative scam. I don’t remember where I read it (google is failing me and I’m not at home so I don’t have my pile o links) but I recall reading last year that the chances of the parents of a missing child consulting (and paying for) a psychic investigator approaches 100% around day three. They are desperate, they are getting phone calls every day (sometimes every 5 minutes) from people claiming to have ‘seen their child in a vision’ – eventually they are willing to give money to anybody who even appears to be able to help, so it’s just a matter of time before they break down and pick the most convincing-sounding psychic to give their money to.

    It’s great for the psychics, too, because they can beef up their cred by saying things like ‘Psychic Bobby Bobberson has assisted the police in over 30 missing persons cases’, never mind they never found anybody.

    All it requires is a complete lack of scruples.

  6. dali70 says

    I’v seen this crap first hand. About 5 years ago my girlfriends sister disappeared, apparently abducted in the night from her home. There were “psychics” literally crawling out of nowhere, offering the family their services. The only common theme any of them had was…”I see trees, and possibly water.” Really? Considering she lived out in the damn sticks it’s kind of a no brainer they’re trees and water for hundreds of square miles. I tried to warn the family about being taken advantage of or getting their hopes up over one of the predictions. No one listened to me. They coughed up money and went on numerous searches based on what they were told. It was tragic to watch. They were vulnerable and the con-artists saw a pay day. To this day she’s never been found and no new information has surfaced.

  7. Jeremy Shaffer says

    “No psychic can answer every question,” Henderson explains

    I disagree; a psychic can, and will, answer every question and often with some ease. The problem is that the answers are usually wrong, useless or some contemptible combination of the two.

  8. Sastra says

    I suspect a lot of the psychics who call up on these cases don’t know they aren’t psychic. They believe they are — and they want to help. Especially the amateurs.

    That doesn’t excuse them. It may partly explain them, but ‘good intentions’ are not an excuse, especially in these volatile and tragic situations which anyone with any rational sense of proportion and caution would stay the hell away from. These psychics have no such sense. So I don’t give a damn that they “mean well.”

    I know a lot of people who believe in psychics and approve of those who offer to assist the grieving: they usually invoke “at least they mean well” to buttress the “no psychic can answer every question” and thus hope to stave off my objections that it doesn’t work.

  9. Homo Straminus says

    Was there a conversation about this somewhere recently? From that discussion:

    It seems like a no-brainer that if money changes hands there should be a contract which stipulates that if the psychic’s information does not materially help the search, then the money must be returned.

    Or you could crank it up a notch, have the psychic sign a statement declaring “I certify this information is correct,” and then if it doesn’t help, then the psychic is engaging in fraud and should be prosecuted accordingly.

  10. caseloweraz says

    Chief Deputy Rick Abben observed, “No two are having the same vision I guess you could say.”

    I foresaw that this would happen. I saw it in a vision…

    /sarc

    Jeremy Shaffer hits the nail on the head, up-thread.

  11. eric says

    “No two are having the same vision I guess you could say.”

    Funny, the same problem occurs in religion.

    I call this the imprecision problem. Treating revelation or psychic power as a detection instrument, we have to say that we don’t know the detector’s accuracy (because we have no independent access to the thing its measuring). But we can say that it’s horribly imprecise. Which makes it a terrible detection instrument, even if it is accurate.

    Revelation is like a bathroom scale that gives you your weight, +/- 500 pounds. It doesn’t matter if its accurate or not. Stop even worrying about the answer to that question. Such an imprecise instrument is crap and you shouldn’t trust it because of its imprecision alone.

  12. lofgren says

    Is there no heartache or tragedy so sacrosanct that some charlatan (or a few scores of them) won’t try to profit from?

    That’s like asking if there is a pizza so delicious that I wouldn’t try to eat it.

  13. says

    Rather than give us vague hints about where they think the girls are, why don’t they go and fucking get them? Really, that would solve everyone’s problem, now wouldn’t it?

  14. says

    I get that the families in these situations want to explore every single option when they are trying to find their missing children, but come on, psychics? If anyone was really a medium they would be able to tell everyone exactly where the children are, who took them and they wouldn’t have so many wildly different “tips”. There would be no need for search parties, or police. The use of psychics is ridiculous and every time I see it I get a little angry.

  15. DaveL says

    I seem to recall a case in British Columbia where a self-proclaimed ‘psychic’ found the body of a missing hiker. He did it by personally searching the woods on foot for six months straight – but the headline was still “Psychic locates body of missing hiker”.

  16. Hercules Grytpype-Thynne says

    literally crawling out of nowhere

    Now there’s a neat trick. Who says psychics don’t have special abilities?

  17. Leo says

    The quoted psychic’s storefront is a couple blocks from my house.

    Well…geez…there’s the problem! Ace, your skepticism is interfering with the energy she’s trying to detect! You and the other skeptics in that neighborhood. I wonder, since I live in about a 3 mile radius from there, if my skepticism is blocking energy as well? :)

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