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WND Pushes Ron Wyatt’s Nonsense

The Worldnutdaily is recycling a 9 year old story that is based on even older claim by creationist fraud Ron Wyatt in order to sell a documentary that claims to have found the exact place where the Red Sea was parted by God to let the Israelites escape from Egypt.

Ron Wyatt claimed to have found a chariot wheel at the bottom of the Red Sea near Nuweiba, Egypt, which he also claimed to have had validated as an Egyptian chariot wheel from the proper time period. There have been several “documentaries” made about this, all making essentially the same claim that this validates the exodus story in the Bible. WND even calls it “irrefutable evidence,” but it is nothing of the sort.

“I am 99.9 percent sure I picked up a chariot wheel,” said Peter Elmer, a forklift mechanic from Keynsham, England, who made two diving trips to the Gulf of Aqaba branch of the sea. “It was covered in coral.”

“I believe I actually sat in an ancient chariot cab,” he told WND at the time, referring to his time exploring a submerged item in the underwater junkyard. “Without question, it is most definitely the remains of the Egyptian army.”

Well it’s nice to know that a forklift operator has declared that he has discovered something that is “without question” what he wanted to believe was true.

“Even a novice can readily see that these are not natural coral formations,” Rood said, showing a variety of circular shapes he insists are chariot wheels, some with axles still intact.

He gave special attention to a single gold-veneered, four-spoked chariot wheel that was photographed and buried in place with a marker buoy nearby.

“Because coral does not attach to gold or silver, this priceless specimen remains untarnished by time,” he said, calling it “strong evidence that this is actually one of the two chariot wheels that the pharaoh rode to his death.”

Yeah, except…not so much. John Loftus actually debunked this one years ago. There is no reason why coral would not grow on gold or silver, nor is there any reason to believe that what is found there is anything but the most mundane of objects. There are a million ways a chariot wheel might be on the sea floor, especially in an area that is relatively shallow and part of a land bridge. This is like finding big boulders around Jerusalem and claiming that this is “irrefutable evidence” that Jesus rolled one of them away from his tomb when he was resurrected.

Comments

  1. dingojack says

    Hey WND – I’ve got absolute proof that God made man out of common clay.
    For a small fee (say $1,000,000 AUD, in non-sequential, unmarked bills) this precious container of the actual stuff God made into man can be yours.
    Send your credit card details now, before the ungodly snap it up forever!
    Dingo

  2. Sassafras says

    So … they basically think it’s impossible to ever carry chariots or chariot parts on boats?

  3. Doug Little says

    Looks like a flywheel or pulley from a washing machine. Certainly looks to be in remarkable shape for supposedly being so old. Damn they knew how to make washing machines back then, I can understand why they put up with the hassle of hauling them along during exodus. It’s hard to part with fine craftsmanship like that.

  4. d cwilson says

    If the story was true shouldn’t the proof be HUNDREDS of wheels, not one?

    Obviously, the current rushing back into the part washed all of the other chariots away, preserving only the one the Pharaoh was riding in because, Jesus!

    The standard of proof at World Nut Daily is amazing. Here we have a picture of an round object, no information is given about its age or even if its to the right scale for a chariot wheel, but it’s “irrefutable proof” that Moses parted the Red Sea.

  5. raven says

    Oh yeah? Well I found an apple. You know what that means!

    CHeckMate, Athiest’s!

    Meh!!! That is not such a big deal. We already ate one of the apples from the Tree of Knowledge.

    We are still looking for the Tree of Life, which confers immortality. Let us know when anyone finds it.

  6. Doug Little says

    I’m telling you it’s a washing machine flywheel, how else could Moses and the Israelites keep their laundry clean and fresh smelling, after all the lord seems pretty OCD when it comes to the cleanliness of his angels, all brilliantly white. The least he could do for his chosen people is to supply a washing machine or two. Hey maybe chariot is code for washing machine.

  7. raven says

    IIRC, Ron Wyatt also found Noah’s Ark on Mount Ararat.

    Of course, Noah’s Ark has been found countless times. And will be found again and again as long as US dollars will buy something.

    There seems to be an overbreeding problem with xianity.

    There are myriads of Jesus’s tombs, Noah’s Arks, pieces of the True Cross. Jesus had 17 penis’es, the number of his foreskins stored in European churches.

    He returns every few months to destroy the earth and kill everyone. Jesus has hordes of Prophets he talks to, who oddly enough, all say different things.

  8. tbp1 says

    I’ve GOT to stop following links to WND. The level of incredulity and stupidity on display there really makes we despair for the future of humanity. I know everyone is subject to wishful thinking at times, but it literally seems like the only criterion they have for believing something is that they want it to be true.

  9. flyv65 says

    He’s 99.9 per cent sure? So he doesn’t know then.

    Bryan…sharing truth from a hot dog commercial…

  10. enopoletusharding says

    There is no “land bridge” at Nuweiba, though, from the photograph, it does look like the film was shot in a relatively shallow (<60 ft. deep) area just S. of Nuweiba. I agree with Doug Little at #5 that the "chariot wheel" is a 20th-century handwheel or flywheel.

  11. tfkreference says

    I’ve never seen coral growing on the gold chalices at church, so there’s further support for his argument.

  12. Moggie says

    tbp1:

    I know everyone is subject to wishful thinking at times, but it literally seems like the only criterion they have for believing something is that they want it to be true.

    Well yeah, it’s called religion.

  13. Doug Little says

    I agree with Doug Little at #5 that the “chariot wheel” is a 20th-century handwheel or flywheel.

    Aww man your’e wrecking my image of some primitive goad herders hauling washing machines through the desert all Monty Python like.
    Once at the Red Sea trying valiantly to get them across the divide before Moses can’t hold the waters back anymore. I’m thinking that maybe someone broke Moses’ concentration as the last few stragglers were wrestling with the machines and that’s how they ended up where they did. That’s my story based on the evidence I’ve seen anyway.

  14. kraut says

    Un-fucking-believable. A guy with impeccable credentials as an archeologist (I wonder if he even can spell it correctly without spellchecker)finds something somewhere and claims it to be something or other.
    Definite proof of: the utter lunacy of a man way beyond his area of competence, the utter idiocy of a rag that is manned by moneygrubbing shyster publishing any at all shit as long as it turns a buck, no matter the smell, and the utter moronicity of all those who really believe that crap.
    We are surrounded – by a wall of idiots thousands deep.

  15. naturalcynic says

    Couldn’t be Pharaoh’s chariot. I saw it in the movie. He was still on the opposite bank from Moses, crapping in his pants when his army was destroyed. And he was planning how to erase all evidence of the Hebrews from the records.

  16. says

    I spent a considerable bit of time there the other day (along with EnopoletusHarding @12) trying to refute some of the pure, unadulterated, credulous, nonsense that was coming from the comments (which were running about 10-1 along the lines of “OMG, it’s True! Praise be Jesus!”).

    It was a losing cause, proving once again that you can’t reason someone out that which they weren’t reasoned into..

  17. says

    Importantly, this is not what chariot wheels look like when they’ve been lying at the bottom of the sea.

    Chariot wheels were not made of gold. They would be far too malleable — they’d wear out in a mile or less. And the bronze or iron wheels were not the entire wheel. Too heavy. The metal was the ring around the wheel — basically the “tire” part that touched the ground. The rest — spokes, hub, etc., would have been made of wood. Which in the sea would deteriorate pretty rapidly.

    The photo is obviously a modern artifact.

    If you want to see a real ancient Egyptian chariot wheel, go to the Egyptian museum in Milan, Italy. It has a very nice example, plus a sampling from the Book of the Dead.

  18. says

    It was pointed out, also, that the Titanic has been under water for only 100 years, and has deteriorated to the point that it would be impossible to raise it now without it falling apart, with the likelihood that it will have totally dissolved in about another 100 years.

    And they think wooden wheels rimmed with metal are still there after 3000 years?

  19. Doug Little says

    I really want to present my hypothesis of ancient washing machine components to the mob at WND but couldn’t be bothered creating an account to comment. I have enjoyed some of the comments over there though.

  20. Doug Little says

    p.s. The image that has an axle with two wheels attached superimposed over the top of a coral structure is priceless though, maybe we could have a competition and grab the original and then start superimposing other shit that seems to fit over the top of it. Could be quite amusing.

  21. billydee says

    Ron Wyatt also claimed that he found the Ark of the Covenant (the magic box from “Raiders of the Lost Ark”). It was directly under the spot where, he claimed, Jeesus was crucified. He said he saw the dried blood and water that dripped from Jeebus’ body during the crucifixion. He actually said “dried water.” He said that the site was later sealed up by the Israelis so on one can look for it now. What a moran! His wife, I think, is still making money selling Ron’s books and shit.

  22. M Groesbeck says

    @22 —

    That sounds like a somethingawful.com Photoshop Phriday in the making…

  23. Artor says

    I saw a rusty shopping cart in a canal. It’s irrefutable proof that the Israelites crossed there with their groceries.

  24. 'Tis Himself says

    Aww man your’e wrecking my image of some primitive goad herders hauling washing machines through the desert all Monty Python like.

    Since laundry detergent and fabric softeners hadn’t been invented then, what good would washing machines do?

  25. Doug Little says

    Since laundry detergent and fabric softeners hadn’t been invented then, what good would washing machines do?

    God works in mysterious ways!

  26. Doug Little says

    Since laundry detergent and fabric softeners hadn’t been invented then, what good would washing machines do?

    Pope on a rope?

  27. emptyknight says

    Since laundry detergent and fabric softeners hadn’t been invented then, what good would washing machines do?

    They were washed in the blood of the lamb, of course!

    What kind of dinosaurs pulled the chariots?

    Velociraptors, I’m 99.9 percent sure.

  28. kraut says

    “He said he saw the dried blood and water that dripped from Jeebus’ body during the crucifixion”

    that’s the clincher – only a miracle would preserve dried water. Had to jeebus cruci”fiction” spot

  29. Randomfactor says

    Since laundry detergent and fabric softeners hadn’t been invented then, what good would washing machines do?

    Day-old manna hadda have SOME uses…maybe it’s a laundry detergent AND a dessert topping. Or is that “desert topping”?

  30. sosw says

    A guy with impeccable credentials as an archeologist (I wonder if he even can spell it correctly without spellchecker)

    While modern spellcheckers will accept that, I believe the preferred spelling is still archaeologist…

  31. says

    Guess what, Ed — now FtB’s advertizers are pushing Ron Wyatt’s nonsense too. When they’re not pushing those inexplicably ridiculous “Become a Gunsmith” ads, that is…

  32. The Lorax says

    “Look! Irrefutable, scientific evidence of what I believe in!”

    “Look! Irrefutable, scientific of something you don’t believe in!”

    “Fuck you!”

    And the world turns…

  33. thisisaturingtest says

    From the article:

    A well-known Swedish scientist who is among the Red Sea researchers believes the waters of Aqaba were indeed split supernaturally.
    Lennart Moller of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm told WND there are no natural, scientific explanations for the parting miracle described in Scripture.

    How about “it didn’t happen”? Wouldn’t it be more scientific, Mr (or Ms- not sure here) “well-known Swedish scientist,” to prove something actually happened first, before looking for explanations, natural or supernatural, as to how it did? Christ on a bicycle- WND reminds me more and more every day of the old “National Enquirer” style tabloids. Wait…

  34. kantalope says

    archeology – American spelling
    archaeology – British spelling

    USAians – don’t go for the dipthonging

    The pillars are pretty convincing too. I mean what other purpose could a pillar have than that which that guy wants to prove?

    And imagine the surprise when this guy went swimming and the first thing he finds is Pharaoh’s chariot wheel. I mean how many square miles is the red sea and boom Pharaoh’s own wheels. I’m 99.9% sure that is some pretty good finding going on there.

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