Seattle Cop Arrested for Domestic Assault


A high-ranking Seattle police officer has been charged with domestic violence after allegedly hitting his wife during an argument. But there are many aspects to the story that are worth noting. First, praise should be given for the department reacting swiftly and correctly in this case:

Lowe was arrested Saturday night after officers responded to a report of a domestic-violence incident, the Seattle police statement said.

At the direction of Deputy Chief Nick Metz, Capt. Neil Low went to the scene, relieved Lowe of duty and took his badge and gun.

Although the preliminary investigation was conducted by Seattle police, Police Chief John Diaz has directed that an outside agency — still to be determined — conduct the criminal investigation, according to the statement. The department’s Office of Professional Accountability will monitor the criminal investigation and, once it concludes, begin its own internal inquiry.

That’s good so far. But it turns out that Lowe has a rather checkered past:

His 2008 DUI arrest attracted attention because he was allowed to supervise a Seattle police security detail at President Obama’s inauguration in January 2009, even though the arrest had taken place Nov. 23, 2008.

Lowe had been stopped on Interstate 5 in South Seattle by a State Patrol trooper. A blood-alcohol test administered to Lowe about an hour after the stop registered 0.113 percent, above the state’s legal limit of 0.08 percent for those over 21, according to a State Patrol report.

Lowe pleaded guilty to an amended charge of reckless driving in June 2009. Under a deferred sentence, that charge was dismissed in 2011 after he completed alcohol-information school, probation, community service and other terms.

It was not clear Sunday how the Police Department dealt internally with the case…

In another matter, Lowe received a written reprimand after the department found he entered a jail cell in June 2006 and made inappropriate physical contact with his son, then 13, who had been arrested for allegedly obstructing officers and was handcuffed.

The boy alleged his father punched him and pushed him against a wall. Lowe told internal investigators he grabbed the boy by his sweatshirt and pulled him up from a bench in a way that was “not gentle,” police records show.

The City Attorney’s Office declined to bring charges, citing proof problems and a parent’s right to discipline a child, according to the records.

Also, Lowe received an oral reprimand after entering a private home in 2002 to try to recover nude photographs of a female relative from a man who reportedly had been romantically involved with her.

In 2007, a citizen-review-board report cited that case as one of several in which then-Police Chief Gil Kerlikowske reduced disciplinary findings.

The civilian director at that time of the department’s Office of Professional Accountability had recommended findings of misuse of authority and violation of rules, regulations and laws, the board said. Kerlikowske reached a lesser finding, concluding that the officer engaged in conduct unbecoming an officer, the report said.

So we have drunk driving, multiple counts of domestic violence, and abusing his authority with an illegal entry and search. Despite all that, he was put in charge of a police detail that dealt with security at Obama’s inauguration and in charge of a task force to make changes in response to a federal case that has found a terrible track record of police misconduct, brutality and racist law enforcement in the Seattle PD. And guess who was the chief of police during all of that? Gil Kerlikowske, who was named by Obama to be his drug czar.

Comments

  1. left0ver1under says

    If John Smith assaults a cop he will get a stiffer sentence than if he assaults Bob Johnson. Cops claim they should be better protected from violence and crime than civilians, as if their lives were more valuable.

    So why don’t cops get a stiffer sentence for their crimes? Aren’t they supposed to know the law better, supposed to uphold the law and be examples of it? There’s a better argument for that happening than how it works now.

    Instead, cops get slaps on the wrist and a green light to commit further crimes. Lowlifes like Lowe go unpunished until it becomes too embarrassing for the government to continue pretend it doesn’t know.

    Lowe’s arrest isn’t about wrongdoing, it’s about public relations and damage control. *If* he gets punished at all, it won’t be commensurate to the crime.

  2. addiepray says

    So Low relieved Lowe of his badge, but Loew and Loh get off scott free? I smell something fishy.

  3. timberwoof says

    Well, said Timberwoof, snark as think as grape jelly dripping off his peanut-butter-and-snark sandwich, “Cops are only human.”

  4. Gregory in Seattle says

    Before praising the SPD too much, keep in mind: they are still under the watchful eye of the FBI and the Department of Justice after investigation found a prolonged and systemic abuse of police authority. Any failure to have acted very swiftly would have been noted and very likely resulted in sanctions.

  5. says

    Gregory is right, they’re doing this to look good.

    They really don’t give a shit — not even a tiny fart — until a woman dies, and even then… well, you’d have to have *ahem* “connections” for any real investigation to be done.

  6. Gregory in Seattle says

    @WMDKitty #6 – When a person dies at the hands of the Seattle Police Department, on duty or off, they don’t care unless it results in substantial negative publicity; at that point, it becomes a matter of damage control rather than justice.

    That was the whole point of the FBI investigation into the SPD, and the conclusion reached by FBI investigators.

Leave a Reply