The Worldnutdaily Lauds Own Greatness


The Worldnutdaily’s Joe Kovacs writes all about why he left the mainstream media to join Joseph Farah’s merry band of idiots and lunatics, the first in what they promise is a whole series of such posts to celebrate their 15th anniversary. And this is really funny stuff. You see, Joe used to run some local TV stations. And he once met Peter Jennings. So he was a Very Important Journalist. But then he realized that his job was boring and his colleagues were bad journalists:

I spent 10 years broadcasting news on the radio before making the jump to television, where I ran network affiliates and got to hang out with some of the biggest names in the industry, such as ABC News legend Peter Jennings.

But after 15 years in the so-called mainstream media, the news became somewhat repetitive to me. On any given day, certain stories were always covered, without exception. For instance, although it’s been many years since I’ve been running local TV news stations, I can virtually guarantee you that on July 4, 2012, you can turn on virtually any Florida television station and you’ll see the typical stories about the Coast Guard and other marine agencies on the hunt for drunk boaters, as well as some kind of report about how not to leave your hand full of bloody nubs where your fingers used to be before blowing them off with fireworks.

I also realized that many events my colleagues covered were not just an objective reporting of facts. There seemed to be an agenda behind many of the stories, not just in their selection, but in the way they were reported. I grew frustrated and perhaps a little jaded, and desperately wanted to cover real news, the important events of the nation and world, without any political agenda as an undercurrent.

So he applied to the Worldnutdaily, which has no political agenda whatsoever. #blackwhite

As I perused the news on WND, I was amazed at the sources from which many of the reports originated. There were papers that I’d never previously read, such as the London Telegraph, the Australian and the South China Morning Post. It was a far cry from the typical blather we’d so often say in TV or radio: “The New York Times is reporting yada, yada, yada.” It was as if there were no other source for my colleagues in the broadcast media.

Anyway, one day at the bottom of the website, there was a headline that read: “Come work for WorldNetDaily.” Once I clicked on the associated article, it said something to the effect of, “We want to turn this operation into the best news source in the world.”

That’s all I needed to hear. Or read. Whatever.

It was my chance to get out of the B.S. world of broadcast “news” and enter the real world of hard-hitting journalism.

Ah yes, hard-hitting journalism like “hey, here’s an obscure minister you’ve never heard of and he’s written a book that only crazy people will think is anything but moronic, so read our fake ‘article’ that’s really and advertisement for the book so we can make money from the sale.”

I had finally found a news agency that cared about reporting the news. I mean the real news. The news that matters. Not the daily body count of who shot whom and what’s the weather guess. I was working with some of the finest journalists alive, and everyone there knew (and still knows) that we indeed have a team gifted and blessed with extraordinary talent.

I think readers both old and new instantly recognize they get more real journalism from WND than any other news source on the planet, whether it was from the middle of nowhere, or now headquartered in new offices in the nation’s capital.

It was, and still is, all about finding and reporting the most important, hard-hitting, relevant and interesting information on any given day. Because we don’t follow the drumbeat of the mainstream media, we’re free to focus on what’s important to real people, without the phony-baloney hype and agenda-driven reports that seem so ubiquitous in today’s news industry.

Since the start of the brand-new millennium, I’ve written hundreds of news reports for WND. My colleagues have written thousands more cumulatively with tons of scoops over the years. My own archive is packed with stories ranging from the possible discovery of ancient Egyptian chariot wheels sitting at the bottom of the Red Sea, to Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s probe of Barack Obama’s eligibility to be president, to roundups of the funniest news of the year.

I’ve also had the freedom to write books such as “Shocked by the Bible” and “The Divine Secret: The Awesome and Untold Truth About Your Phenomenal Destiny” (coming July 17). If I were still in the brain-dead world of TV and radio news, I don’t know that I ever would have produced those focus-on-God projects.

Wow. Just wow. If he managed to type that with a straight face, that makes it even funnier.

Comments

  1. dingojack says

    The Worldnutdaily Lauds Own Greatness
    [points]
    Bwhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
    [Takes breath, wipes eyes]
    Bwhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
    [Rinse, repeat ad infinitum]

    Dingo

  2. says

    My Dad worked in radio and tv news for 25 years. He would be spinning in his grave if he could hear such nonsense spouted by a broadcast professional today. He considered his profession to be a form of public service and would be appalled at the lack of respect this jackwagon is showing for the craft.

  3. twincats says

    …the typical stories about the Coast Guard and other marine agencies on the hunt for drunk boaters, as well as some kind of report about how not to leave your hand full of bloody nubs where your fingers used to be before blowing them off with fireworks.

    lol, What a stupid example.

    Because warning people not to drive a boat while drunk and encouraging firework safety is a bad thing? An unnecessary thing? Oh! Right, it’s just repetitive and shouldn’t be included in the news because drunk boating arrests and fireworks injuries aren’t AT ALL repetitive, especially if the news omits any and all such warnings.

  4. Taz says

    But after 15 years in the so-called mainstream media, the news became somewhat repetitive to me.

    So I decided to join an outfit where I could make up my own!

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