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Mar 28 2012

Ft. Bragg Won’t Let RBB Feed Homeless Vets

Justin Griffith writes that the higher ups at Ft. Bragg are refusing to allow us to collect canned goods at this weekend’s Rock Beyond Belief event to help feed homeless veterans. They’re using a policy that forbids “fundraising” on the base to do so, but applying it inconsistently:

This means that the evangelicals surely had to follow this law too, right? Of course not.

They were permitted to raise funds (in the form of cash!) for months on post. They raised $54,000 in tithing at every chapel on post – there are several. That is a colossal fundraising effort, repeatedly violating the regulation – at multiple locations on post.

They spent the money on radio commercials (over $5K) and newspapers ($5K) and sandwiches, face paint, transportation and hotel rooms for their guests, etc. It represents institutionalized violations of the ethics code that they claim applies to their own event. The cleverest among you may notice that the entire point of their event was to convert as many people as possible to Christianity – a membership drive is an understatement. People should be in a massive amount of trouble for this!

Because there are loopholes that allow the chaplains to do what no one else can do. And to this day, Griffith’s atheist group is not allowed to meet on the base, they have to meet off the base. It’s just another example to show why Rock Beyond Belief and the larger movement on behalf of atheists in the military is so important.

And how myopic of the base commanders. Do they really want to take a stand against helping homeless vets? A huge number of the homeless are vets. The collection of food will go on, but it must go on at the afterparty at the hotel rather than at the event itself.

6 comments

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  1. 1
    Modusoperandi

    And how myopic of the base commanders. Do they really want to take a stand against helping homeless vets? A huge number of the homeless are vets.

    That’s just collateral damage. It’s a small price to pay to stick it to those…those…those you know whats.

  2. 2
    Chris A

    Well you know, it starts with some canned goods, offered with good intentions, next it is sandwiches and soup, and soon they start wandering into affluent suburbs, and lose the ability to survive in the wild. It is for their own good, really.
    </disgust>

  3. 3
    garnetstar

    What if the canned goods collection point is set up right outside the gate of Fort Bragg? Everyone could drive up, leave their contribution on the last bit of off-base land, then drive in.

    Serving soldiers could leave the base, buy some goods, drop them at the collection point, and go back onto the base.

    Just to rub their noses in it.

  4. 4
    Worldtraveller

    Are you sure that the regs disallow any fundraising, as you imply here? (I haven’t checked.) If the rule only applies to ‘special events’ or something like that, the higher ups might be technically within the rules, even though I agree it makes them look like total assholes.

  5. 5
    greg1466

    I’m sure they’d be quick to point out the charitable acts of religions as a sign of their benefit to society. Convenient when you don’t allow non-religious people to perform charitable acts.

  6. 6
    democommie

    Ed:

    I’m thinking that you need to tell the local veteran’s groups about the “fundraising” thing and let THEM pressure the brAsshats until they crumble like the cowardly dickwads that they are. You can bet your ass that somewhere in the chain of command there’s a KKKristianist who is doing everything he can to make this event a failure. Along those lines, you also need to alert the local news media and the local chapter of the ACLU (unless you’ve done so already.

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