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Wingnuts to ‘Encircle’ Supreme Court With Prayer

The Christian Defense Coalition and a collection of other Christian right groups has a plan to make sure they win the lawsuit over the health care reform law. They’re going to surround the Supreme Court with people and pray the day before the oral argument takes place.

“We are calling people from all America to come to Supreme Court and ‘encircle it with prayer’ from March 25-28 as we cry out to God for justice, human rights and religious freedom.

“Sadly, the President’s Health Care legislation crushes religious freedom and liberty with unjust mandates on faith institutions and forces taxpayers to pay for abortions.

“We will be praying that Obamacare is declared unconstitutional so Congress can put forward health care legislation that will respect religious freedom, protect human life and honor the principles of our Constitution.

“When Roe v. Wade was decided, the Christian community was detached and uninvolved. We want to make sure that is not the case this time as we challenge people of faith to publicly pray and speak out with boldness and passion.”

You just pray your little hearts out, folks. It keeps you from doing something that actually has meaning for a few days.

Comments

  1. says

    I’m thinking about these prayers in a different fashion at the moment: If they’re praying to directly, forcibly change the judges’ decision making thoughts, would it be appropriate to treat that as (badly) attempted mind control? There may not be a law explicitly against mind control, but I imagine it’s at least some kind of civil rights violation to forcibly take away a person’s ability to make their own decisions, using their own judgement.

    Of course, it’s a moot point since it won’t have an effect, but I think it’s fun to imagine wingnuts trying to defend the practice without looking like they’re trying to defend it. Of course, I imagine we’re at the point that the Santorums of the world wouldn’t bother trying to cover up their intention.

  2. davidct says

    They had better be prepared for an answer they did not expect. Our Gov. Rick Perry prayed for rain and we got wildfires. Of course the fires were entirely predictable from the effects of heat and drought so it probably was not an answer. It was just nature doing what it does which is often not warm and cuddly.

  3. d cwilson says

    “Sadly, the President’s Health Care legislation crushes religious freedom and liberty with unjust mandates on faith institutions and forces taxpayers to pay for abortions.

    Except, of course, that it doesn’t do either of these things, but what’s a little bearing of false witness during your prayers?

  4. Michael Heath says

    Ed reports:

    The Christian Defense Coalition and a collection of other Christian right groups has a plan to make sure they win the lawsuit over the health care reform law. They’re going to surround the Supreme Court with people and pray the day before the oral argument takes place.

    What a perfectly illustrative example of the merging of political conservatism with religious fundamentalism. Conservative Christianity has become politicized to the point the political objectives drive the agenda while relying on the moronic delusional approach to thinking demanded by their religion.

  5. harold says

    Although I perceive health care legislation associated with President Obama as overall better than no reform at all, I do strongly oppose the idea of a mandate requiring individual health insurance.

    Putting aside constitutional issues, fining people for not being able to afford something is a foolish policy (and unless you literally claim that all people without health insurance can afford health insurance, this is the policy). Additionally, most bankrupticies due to medical bills already happen to people who have private health insurance. It just doesn’t provide the coverage they need. Such bankruptcies shift the cost of the patients’ past and future care to the taxpayers and to non-profit health care institutions, while simultaneously wrecking the credit of the victims. They might also potentially lead to worrisome gaps in health care provision in some cases.

    The rational response of health insurance companies to the mandate will be to create cheap but low quality coverage plans for uninsured Americans (because they would certainly rather that financially strapped Americans pay them some premiums, than they be fined for not doing so). One highly plausible outcome would be that Americans mandated to pay, and able to afford only such plans, will find that they have very poor coverage and quickly go bankrupt if they experience a major health crisis. In such a scenario, health insurance companies will experience a bonanza of new premiums, but the costs of providing health care will continue to fall on the taxpayer and on non-profit institutions. Incidentally, although point blank telling patients that their coverage is over is common, another trick is to tell patients that we will keep covering you, but that your “premiums have gone up”, to such an extent that the patient clearly can’t afford them, and can be cut off for “not paying the premiums”.

    There is an example of mandated private insurance coverage that more or less works – automobile liability insurance. But 1) it is much cheaper, 2) this is not intended as a complement to automobile insurance companies, but I perceive that they have a better track record of dealing with major liabilities than health insurance companies and 3) it is nevertheless the case that in areas where gross incomes are often very low and public transportation is poor, such as much of the south, that uninsured drivers are a major problem.

    (What I personally support is making Medicare voluntarily available to all regardless of age, with Medicare reimbursements to health care providers remaining at current rates, adjusted for inflation or rising costs.)

  6. says

    They had better be prepared for an answer they did not expect. Our Gov. Rick Perry prayed for rain and we got wildfires. Of course the fires were entirely predictable from the effects of heat and drought so it probably was not an answer. It was just nature doing what it does which is often not warm and cuddly.

    And don’t forget Perry slashing the budget for volunteer fire departments as a contributing anthropogenic factor.

  7. dali70 says

    It’s against federal law to protest on the grounds surrounding the supreme court.

    Title 40, Subtitle II, Part C, Chapter 61, Subchapter IV, Section 6135 of the US Code: “It is unlawful to parade, stand, or move in processions or assemblages in the Supreme Court Building or grounds, or to display in the Building and grounds a flag, banner, or device designed or adapted to bring into public notice a party, organization, or movement.”

    This has been on the books for decades, but the wingnuts will claim it’s Obama’s “war on religion” and scream about it all over the airwaves. Guaranteed.

  8. says

    harold: My understanding is that the mandate would be accompanied by a subsidy for low-income households, but admittedly it’s been a while since I last heard about it.

  9. Michael Heath says

    TCC writes:

    My understanding is that the mandate would be accompanied by a subsidy for low-income households, but admittedly it’s been a while since I last heard about it.

    Obamacare does provide subsidies for private insurance for those unable to afford coverage, it also expands coverage via Medicaid and SCHIP.

    Whether Obamacare is perfectly executed out of the gate is irrelevant from a long-term operational standpoint, though certainly not from a political perspective. What’s important here is the strategic change, which is that the federal government is creating an environment for universal coverage which puts nearly all the onus on them to manage costs. This strategic change is probably the most important aspect of Obamacare where it went largely undebated.

    From an economic perspective given we know the healthcare finance market is a failed market and has been for decades now, the fact the federal government has mandated universal coverage while also setting minimal coverage requirements is perhaps the biggest fundamental difference between the old model and the new one. It puts far more federal skin in the game to repair this failed market.

  10. eric says

    Bronze Dog: If they’re praying to directly, forcibly change the judges’ decision making thoughts, would it be appropriate to treat that as (badly) attempted mind control?

    Nope. I don’t have the cite, but IIRC in the US there’s a long-standing legal precedent that curses, voodoo, intercessory prayer etc. don’t constitute any form of assault because no reasonable observer would believe they work.

    Heh.

  11. eric says

    Michael Heath: What’s important here is the strategic change, which is that the federal government is creating an environment for universal coverage which puts nearly all the onus on them to manage costs…It puts far more federal skin in the game to repair this failed market.

    I completely agree. Which is why this case concerns me. I would hate to see the ‘skin in the game’ aspect scuttled because the way it was executed gets ruled unconstitutional.

  12. busterggi says

    Haven’t these people already been doing this same praying for more than 30 years?

    Man, when Jesus puts his followers on hold he really puts them on hold.

  13. peterh says

    A circle of sufficient size would take quite a few points to establish it as a geometric figure. It would take only five of the faithful to establish a pentacle.

  14. Aquaria says

    Slackers. I seem to recall that Abbie Hoffman and some of his hippie/yippie friends chanted away the evil spirits of a federal building and made it levitate. Or that was the claim Abbie made for a while there.

    Top that, christers!

  15. Who Knows? says

    What I personally support is making Medicare voluntarily available to all regardless of age, with Medicare reimbursements to health care providers remaining at current rates, adjusted for inflation or rising costs

    If we ask hospitals not to turn away anyone, insurance companies not to drop coverage and work toward the goal of universal health care, voluntary insurance will only compound the problems.

    Insurance is an investment. We are paying today, what we will certainly need some time in the future. Insurance doesn’t work if we don’t pay anything into the system before it is needed.

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