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Dec 27 2011

OMG! Obama Hates Christmas!

The religious right’s latest faux freakout is over the Obama family holiday card because — gasp! — it doesn’t mention Christmas! The hissy fit is being led by the queen bee of shallow and stupid, Sarah Palin.

The official White House holiday card makes no mention of the word ‘Christmas’ and instead focused on Bo the First Dog based on the wishes of the First Family.

“From our family to yours, may your holidays shine with the light of the season,” read the inside of the card, featuring the presidential seal.

The front of the card features Bo the First Dog lounging by a fireplace. Holiday greenery is draped over the fireplace mantle. Holiday presents are placed on a table underneath a poinsettia – instead of a Christmas tree…

Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin told Fox News & Commentary that she found the card to be a bit unusual.

“It’s odd,” she said, wondering why the president’s Christmas card highlights his dog instead of traditions like “family, faith and freedom.”

Yeah, how odd that they didn’t use the preprogrammed, moronic cliches preferred by Sarah Palin in lieu of having to actually think.

Palin said the majority of Americans can appreciate the more traditional, “American foundational values illustrated and displayed on Christmas cards and on a Christmas tree.”

As for the Obama card, she replied, “It’s just a different way of thinking coming out of the White House.”

Different than what, exactly? Not different than Bush, the darling of the Christian right. These dimwits said the same thing about his cards, which showed “the presidential pets — two dogs and a cat — frolicking on a snowy White House lawn.”

This month, as in every December since he took office, President Bush sent out cards with a generic end-of-the-year message, wishing 1.4 million of his close friends and supporters a happy “holiday season.”

Many people are thrilled to get a White House Christmas card, no matter what the greeting inside. But some conservative Christians are reacting as if Bush stuck coal in their stockings.

“This clearly demonstrates that the Bush administration has suffered a loss of will and that they have capitulated to the worst elements in our culture,” said William A. Donohue, president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights.

Bush “claims to be a born-again, evangelical Christian. But he sure doesn’t act like one,” said Joseph Farah, editor of the conservative Web site WorldNetDaily.com. “I threw out my White House card as soon as I got it.”

Unsurprisingly, it’s the comments on the Fox News article where the stupid and crazy gets turned up to 11. From some dolt named Valerie Eisner:

Of course there’s no “Christmas”in his card. First he’s a muslim..second hes a muslim and thrid he doesn’t believe in Christmas..and a dam pointsetta plant with presents under it? WTH? Now that’s just wrong! But yet he can spend 4 million dollars on a CHRISTMAS VACATION? Wake up people!

And from Joseph Loerzel:

I think this is taking political correctness too far. We have about 10 holiday weekends a year; this one is different – its Christmas, and if you can’t call it that then why even have it at all? They’re making it into just another routine weekend – like Labor Day. Our traditions and values are going by the wayside.

Please explain how the lack of a mention of Jesus in someone else’s holiday card has any effect whatsoever on how you or anyone else celebrates Christmas. It doesn’t, of course.

Jesus, these people are annoying. I’m glad I have a couple weeks before I can talk about this on the radio. Maybe by then I can do it without violating FCC rules.

26 comments

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  1. 1
    d cwilson

    Just like the teleprompter, czars, addressing school kids, or going to trade summits, everything Obama does is “different”, especially when it’s exactly the same as what previous republican presidents have done.

  2. 2
    Michael Heath

    The president and first lady’s Christmas video message was explicitly and unrelentingly Christian, to an annoying degree (well, at least I was annoyed): http://goo.gl/gRV3a

    In addition Mr. and Mrs. Obama also take on the lonely and politically courageous task of thanking our military and soliciting our prayers for them in that same video. This proves Ms. Palin’s, “family, faith, and freedom” trope doesn’t present the full suite of tripe Americans demand of their president. She needs to up her game given she missed that one.

  3. 3
    Marcus Ranum

    I wish Obama did hate christmas. Then I’d think he actually believed in something.

  4. 4
    Aquaria

    Just when you think this moronic piece of shit can’t get any stupider or traitorous, she finds a whole new level of stupid and traitorous to burrow down into.

  5. 5
    regexp

    “American foundational values illustrated and displayed on Christmas cards and on a Christmas tree.”

    Sigh. Christmas was a minor Christian tradition that most didn’t “celebrate” (at least in the modern sense) and most worked the day.

    And then there was the rioting …

  6. 6
    gshelley

    Greg Laden sort of covered this
    http://freethoughtblogs.com/xblog/2011/12/18/should-there-be-a-white-house-christmas-card/
    Bush was pretty much the first president to go christmas specific rather than holiday, so Obama is just being traditional

  7. 7
    John Hinkle

    They’re making it into just another routine weekend – like Labor Day.

    Funny he picked that holiday, a day celebrating the triumphs of working class people over their corporate masters.

  8. 8
    Strategically Shaved Monkey

    Sarah who?

  9. 9
    Troy Britain

    I recently received a holiday e-mail from my Republican state senator that wished his constituents “Happy Holidays”; no mention of Christmas anywhere.

    I wonder why he (and probably most Republicans) hates the baby Jesus…

  10. 10
    organon

    All of this is a circus that is seeming to me more and more sinister the deeper I look. As I Believe Mr. Brayton has pointed out in the past, there is near silence on all of those things Obama SHOULD be criticized for, while there is near endless noise about nonsensical (baseless) issues. There seems to be way to much effort put into keeping the public divided by parties and then keeping those parties at odds with one another. When there really isn’t that significant a difference between them, especially when it comes down to the politicians. There are things they pay lip service to, but no significant difference when it comes to action. The same corporate interests seem to finance politicians from both parties. Look closer at which ones made huge contributions to the campaign of our current president. And then consider, in that context, the policies he has been following. Notice that the NDAA legislation has been incredibly bipartisan. Opposition to it was even bipartisan. We the public do not hold the mainstream media to meaningful expectations. Ms. Palin’s statement simply further fuels the circus. I believe the country needs to realize what is happening with the parties…and abandon them. Likewise with mainstream media. It is the public that makes their practices profitable. And their practices serve another purpose–distraction. Instead of focusing on real issues, various segments of the population can be manipulated through targeted button pushing propaganda. If they lost enough of their audience, they would be forced to either act more rationally or see their viewership drop to smaller and smaller numbers. At the same time, SOPA/PIPA, along with the 2012 NDAA, are serious threats to the rational independent voices out there…on the web/internet. More have got to put their focus on protecting those independent voices, and ignore the irrational ones. And sometimes it seems they are intentionally irrational. But, regardless, our last hope is defense of the first amendment, as well as constitutional rights in general. Dismiss the irrational for what it is. Do not lose sight of rational defense of our fundamental rights. Those bicker matches serve to keep voices distracted from what they should be focused on. To the extent they keep those distractions, is the extent to which those efforts at distraction are working. Anyone care to discuss the Bill of Rights and the efforts over the past ten years to render it null and void? It cannot be saved by either party. Only through individual, independent, citizens speaking out, exercising first amendment rights while the government pretends we still actually have any such rights. Speak out.

  11. 11
    Pinky

    We the public do not hold the mainstream media to meaningful expectations. Ms. Palin’s statement simply further fuels the circus. I believe the country needs to realize what is happening with the parties…and abandon them. Likewise with mainstream media. It is the public that makes their practices profitable. And their practices serve another purpose–distraction. Instead of focusing on real issues, various segments of the population can be manipulated through targeted button pushing propaganda.

    Bravo Organon – I wanted to highlight some of your great post because it is worth rereading.

    I sometimes feel the rational people of these United States are like frogs in water gradually but inexorably getting hotter. We know we should jump out before boiling point is reached, but we hesitate because once we jump; there will be hardship and hard work.

  12. 12
    Pinky

    Poor, pitiable Palin; she is pared down to pouting peevishness about POTUS postcards.

    Meanwhile, back at the ranch, husband and children wishes she would shut up and let this whole mess get behind them.

    Have her speaking fees dropped?

  13. 13
    dingojack

    Organon – So your brilliant plan is this:

    when it comes time to vote, I’ll cower under my bed. I’m sure that will get the absolutely best possible government, how could it not?

    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before?
    @@ Dingo
    ——–
    If you don’t like the government get off your lardy arse and do something about it. Protest, start a blog, go door-to-door with a petition, hold a block party to spread your views (or listen to those of others) or even *gasp* start your own political party!
    At the moment you are whining about how hard it is to meet the cost of living at a 25-course dinner party.

  14. 14
    marym

    “there is near silence on all of those things Obama SHOULD be criticized for, while there is near endless noise about nonsensical (baseless) issues”

    I think that’s because the larger issues like the economy are so complex even educated people have trouble wrapping their minds around them. The majority of our populace is undereducated so they tend to focus on simple issues like Merry Christmas vs. Happy Holidays. Jefferson said: “Whenever the people are well-informed, they can trusted with their own government”. What we have anymore is an underinformed citzenry facing ever larger and more complex issues.

  15. 15
    organon

    dingojack, it seems you are ascribing something to me that in no way did I think, say, write, imply, or otherwise. If I’m reading what you wrote correctly, then it is intellectual dishonesty. It is much easier to misrepresent what someone said and attack that than discussing accurately what the other has actually said. For anyone who might read it as fact, I will state that at no time have I advised anyone not to vote, implied that I would not vote, or anything similar. There are too many assumptions in the lower section of what you wrote to even start into. When your argument amounts to extreme misrepresentation of someone else, rather than discussing the actual ideas, it is,…cowardly.

  16. 16
    dingojack

    Organon = “I believe the country needs to realize what is happening with the parties…and abandon them“. [ellipsis in the original]
    “… I will state that at no time have I advised anyone not to vote, implied that I would not vote, or anything similar.”

    ‘Impenetrability!’, clearly.

    @@ Dingo

  17. 17
    organon

    @marym

    I appreciate your feedback. I find I must respectfully disagree with the first part, but maybe only partly. From my view, a great many of the important issues are not really that complex. Before being elected, the president spoke brilliantly about some of the issues and about abuses from the then president. But then did exactly what he had earlier spoken so brilliantly against.

    Innocent citizens dying at the hands of swat team invasions (one’s that should not even be taking place) is another important issue most can grasp. There are so many of these types of issues. There are the deaths, abuses, violations of civil liberties, etc., that should be all over the news, but are not. Just as with SOPA and the 2012 NDAA. If he signs off on SOPA, not that complex. Citizens should be let known what is taking place, and hopefully speak out. Likewise with the 2012 NDAA. And likewise with so many other violations of basic civil liberties. I would say that the christmas card issue is actually more complex (and yet is something that amounts to nothing). When they call him a muslim without a shred of evidence, it is not because it is less complex, but rather a way of name calling. It avoids real issues. Or when they say he is establishing sharia law. Or when they say he is not a US born citizen. Or when they say he’s a socialist. And on and on. Those are baseless claims loudly proclaimed. They are distractions taking up airtime while important issues go largely unreported. As far as economic issues, I would have to agree that those are complex, and I didn’t really have those in mind. I’m really looking more at all of those civil liberties issues near and dear to any citizen. Notice the mainstream media blackout on so many of those issues. John Whitehead (Rutherford Institute) has a number of great articles on such issues, as do a number of other writers. It is generally only through such independent sources (mostly on the web) that one winds up aware of so many of the actual issues. And Mr. Brayton’s blog would be another example (kudos). I do agree with you that a more educated citizenry is crucial. There was a study that showed that Fox viewers are actually less informed than those who are consumers of no news sources at all. I believe the most important issues for citizens to educate themselves revolves more around learning about the constitution, the Bill of Rights, etc. Then, getting information from sources that inform the public on important issues. Becoming aware of our rights and speaking out is important. The more the better. For whatever it might be worth.

  18. 18
    organon

    “Organon = “I believe the country needs to realize what is happening with the parties…and abandon them“. [ellipsis in the original]
    “… I will state that at no time have I advised anyone not to vote, implied that I would not vote, or anything similar.”

    ‘Impenetrability!’, clearly.”

    If you believe that has anything whatsoever to do with not voting, then that is on you. How one concludes that not getting bogged down in party politics means one can’t vote I have no idea. Again, on you. I’m pretty sure that there are a lot of citizens who vote and aren’t registered to a party. How you conclude that going independent means you’ll stop voting, again, if you think it’s a rational conclusion, it’s on you. How one realizing that neither party is on the path back to freedom and that freedom will not be returned to through any of those parties, has nothing whatsoever to do with whether one votes, but apparently you conclude otherwise. Voting for someone based on issues other than party to you means not voting, again somehow you seem to find a rational conclusion, but I do not. I hear so often, oh, the Patriot Act is because of that other party. No, both parties voted for it. As they did the 2012 NDAA. And SOPA. And so many other things. The few exceptions were also, generally, among both parties. That was loud and clear in who was opposing the 2012 NDAA. Those few individuals put their career at risk to uphold the Constitution, and as such are probably deserving of vote, regardless of party. I believe Washington warned against parties and the divisions they create. Which is very much something happening, and there is so much focus on the us vs. them, that too many important issues go unreported. But to see that as an issue you conclude is to say that people shouldn’t vote. Whatever method you use to reach such conclusions, I do not know, but it is not reason. It is not my responsibility to help someone else fix their reasoning. Conclude whatever you wish. But please kindly spare me the absurd conclusions. If you disagree with someone, at least have enough intellectual integrity to have honest discussion.

  19. 19
    dingojack

    So if your not going to vote for political parties (which is what you clearly implied by ‘abandoning them’) who are you going to vote for, genius? The drover’s dog?
    England went through years of not having parties, it didn’t make politicians any more honest. Elected officals would vote however they liked at that particular moment, and stuff what those who elected them wanted. Not exactly ‘keeping the bastards honest’.
    Your nice, neat solution is almost definfined by H. L. Mencken:
    For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong“.
    Dingo

  20. 20
    dingojack

    Look, one votes for the ‘least worst’ politician, then tells them that, loudly and often, whilst offering suggestions and options.
    This isn’t the comitia curiata where you get to vote for the next year’s Consul then go home, you have to get involved actively, be your own Tribuni Plebis.
    ‘Democracy isn’t easy. This is advanced citizenship, you’ve got want it bad‘. Not voting for anyone (or wasting it on the ‘one simple idea’ party) isn’t really a solution.
    Dingo

  21. 21
    organon

    Dingojack, I abandoned the parties decades ago, and I still, despite your insisting it not possible, manage to vote in all of the elections, as do millions of independents throughout the country. But you go ahead and conclude independents can’t vote. I, as with plenty of others, don’t vote by party, but rather by person. That the person belong to a party, or which one, is irrelevant. In fact, there are even independents who hold office (independent is not a party, but a declaration of not belonging to one). I will continue voting, as will so many others I know, and I will continue encouraging still others in general to vote. I can’t yet figure out if you’re incredibly dishonest, or incredibly irrational, but either way it no longer matters. I believe there are enough persons here who are honest and rational enough with whom to have honest discussions. You go ahead and continue to conclude whatever you wish.

  22. 22
    dingojack

    Ah – the penny drops. Different systems.
    In Australia one doesn’t register to vote for any particular party, in America you do.
    Still voting for a person is all fine and dandy*, but there’s no guarntee that (s)he will actual do what you want just by virtue of your voting for them. In fact, you can’t be sure with whom political expediency will make them bedfellows, can you?
    So you vote for the ‘party of one’ and hope they’ll be ethical, not just going for short-term political gain and what their focus groups tell them is the lowest common denominator. Just like the bigger parties (at least they have a concrete platform).
    As I said not really a solution.
    Dingo
    —–
    * and how’s that ‘political independence’ over the last ‘couple of decades’ worked out for you, politically?

  23. 23
    slc1

    Re Dingojack @ #22

    In Australia one doesn’t register to vote for any particular party, in America you do.

    That’s not true in every state. For instance, in Virginia where I am registered, there is no party declaration. In fact, in primaries, one can vote in either the Rethuglican or Democratic primary (but not in both).

  24. 24
    organon

    To Pinky:

    My apologies for forgetting to thank you. Thank you for the kind words of encouragement. From my vantage point, I have a very long way to go with writing skills and the level of knowledge in these topics that I seek to reach, but I have been doing my best to speak out while hoping that my efforts contribute to the efforts of others out there. I am glad you found some of what I wrote to be of value, and I appreciate your having taken time to offer the encouraging words. Best wishes…

  25. 25
    dingojack

    OT alert!
    I found these two articles on the same page of the local rag:
    Egyptian court ruling finds military violated womens human rights
    Fury at Ultra-Orthodox Jews after girl abused
    Dingo

  26. 26
    Tony! The Queer Shoop

    Dingojack:

    Organon – So your brilliant plan is this:

    when it comes time to vote, I’ll cower under my bed. I’m sure that will get the absolutely best possible government, how could it not?

    Why hasn’t anyone thought of that before?

    -Where in Organon’s post was this stated or even implied? Having read the whole thing, it’s fairly easy to see the intended plan: speak up and exercise first amendment rights.

    If you don’t like the government get off your lardy arse and do something about it. Protest, start a blog, go door-to-door with a petition, hold a block party to spread your views (or listen to those of others) or even *gasp* start your own political party!

    -all of what you just said falls under First Amendment rights, which is exactly the kind of plan Organon was talking about. Oh, and ad hominem attacks? Not cool.

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