Want to Be Adopted? »« Trump’s Debate Going Nowhere

Return of the Rentboys

A Republican mayor from New Jersey has resigned after he followed in the footsteps of George Rekers and contracted with someone from rentboy.com — I’m sure it was just to carry his luggage, though.

The mayor of Medford, NJ resigned a month after he was accused of soliciting sex with a man from the gay escort site Rentboy.com.

In a letter to Medford town manager and clerk on Monday, Chris Myers said that “my work commitments will not allow me to devote the time that is needed in the months ahead. That is why, today, I am resigning from the Medford Township Council, effective immediately.” …

In October, an anonymous California man accused Myers of agreeing to pay him for sex through the escort site Rentboy.com. The man said that Myers also promised him a car and a recording studio, but then reneged on his promises. In response, the man set up a website detailing their encounter, and included compromising pictures of Myers in blue Calvin Klein underwear (you can see a screenshot here).

Those “work commitments”? He’s actually on administrative leave from his real job.

Comments

  1. Michael Heath says

    Aquaria:

    Maybe he can do some ads for Perry in that Brokeback jacket.

    The Brokeback jacket wasn’t a Carhatt. And Carhartt clothing is associated with people who work outside in inclement weather, along with politicians who pander to them (e.g., Sarah Palin, and now Rick Perry). Their line has nothing to do with gays. It’s like politicians wearing John Deere hats or sporting Pabst Blue Ribbon decals, or rock stars like Kid Rock whose an expert at pandering to a subset of the same crowd Palin and Hank Williams Jr. pander to as well. We just validate our being out of touch with the fly-over states when we repeat this joke.

    Ed reports:

    . . . the man set up a website detailing their encounter, and included compromising pictures of Myers in blue Calvin Klein underwear . . .

    Where’d he get them with such large letters? I know, Google is my friend. I just never saw a pair focused where a person is paying for the privilege of advertising a brand of underwear rather than one’s own package below. Perhaps there’s a reason he wants to divert our attention to Calvin.

  2. Phillip IV says

    Those “work commitments”? He’s actually on administrative leave from his real job.

    Yeah, but when he saw those half-nude pictures of himself on the web, he committed himself to working out three times a week.

  3. slc1 says

    Re Michael Heath @ #2

    The Brokeback jacket wasn’t a Carhatt. And Carhartt clothing is associated with people who work outside in inclement weather, along with politicians who pander to them (e.g., Sarah Palin, and now Rick Perry).

    That entirely misses the point. The jacket worn in the movie, “Brokeback Mountain,” is indistinguishable in appearance from the one that Governor Perry is wearing. Apparently, the governor and his aides and advisers were unaware of the movie or they would have never have set themselves up for the ridicule they are receiving by letting him wear that jacket in the ad. They ducked into the punch.

  4. Michael Heath says

    slc1:

    That entirely misses the point. The jacket worn in the movie, “Brokeback Mountain,” is indistinguishable in appearance from the one that Governor Perry is wearing. Apparently, the governor and his aides and advisers were unaware of the movie or they would have never have set themselves up for the ridicule they are receiving by letting him wear that jacket in the ad. They ducked into the punch.

    Uh, no; not even close. This clothing line is not defined by one mere movie about gays, where it wasn’t even featured. Carhartt is instead defined by its large popularity amongst those who Perry, Palin, Kid Rock, and Hank Williams direct their marketing efforts. I know of no other clothing line which can compete with their market share for outdoor work clothes you’re OK with getting dirty. They’re insulated overalls are especially dominant in my area since we have harsh winters here.

    You can make a good argument Perry’s pandering to rural populists by wearing work clothes which he’s never done a lick of work in himself. Most of us who wear this line of clothes are not worried about getting them dirty in a way you can’t launder out – as ZZ Top sang about their blue jeans, “you can tell by the oil and gasoline”. But you only embarrass yourself by pointing to one character in one movie and claiming Perry’s out of touch when in fact it’s those comparing this coat to a similar one worn in a movie who are out of touch, precisely because they validate their ignorance regarding its authentic popularity. This is not a close call.

  5. carlsonjok says

    That entirely misses the point. The jacket worn in the movie, “Brokeback Mountain,” is indistinguishable in appearance from the one that Governor Perry is wearing. Apparently, the governor and his aides and advisers were unaware of the movie or they would have never have set themselves up for the ridicule they are receiving by letting him wear that jacket in the ad.

    I tend to think my fellow Westerners are full of it when they talk about cultural elitists. But things like this make me wonder if there might just be a kernel of truth to the notion.

    Carhartt jackets are practically the uniform out here in the flyover states. Just about everyone owns at least one. Hell, I am as straight as the come, and I own two. If the first thing you think of when you see a Carhartt jacket is a similar jacket you saw in a movie, then you really need to get out of your bubble a little more often.

  6. Rawnaeris says

    Carhartts are even popular in my line of work. I’m an auditor, but because I have to go to foundries and forges, cotton Carhartts are considered standard protective equipment. Trust me, you want that many layers of a fabric that won’t melt on you when molten metal hits it.

    Given the large number of styles they are available in, I do find it surprising that Perry’s costumer would select that one.

    Re the actual topic:
    I wish I could say I was surprised.

  7. peterh says

    “…those comparing this coat to a similar one worn in a movie who are out of touch…”

    Doesn’t this boil down to Vicarious Voluntary Victimhood? (VVV™) I see this as another example of people so eager to find evil in unsuspected places that I’m immediately led to wonder about just what it might be they fear in themselves.

  8. MikeMa says

    While I haven’t read any family values policy statements by Chris Myers, his party affiliation alone should get the hypocrisy barb thrown in his direction. His sexual repression has lost him a budding political career and sidelined a management position at Lockheed Martin.

    If his political fall had not occurred so early, he might have ended up pulling a Larry Craig after many years of public service probably fighting vehemently against LGBT rights to cover if desires. A society that placed more emphasis on intelligence and honesty over self-interest and demagoguery might have saved this fool.

  9. slc1 says

    Re Michael Heath @ #6

    Mr. Michael Heath swings and misses again. The issue isn’t whether Carhart brand overcoats are good stuff (I don’t personally own one but I do own a Mighty Mac brand overcoat that is similar in appearance). The issue is that the governor records an advertisement bashing gays in which he is seen wearing an overcoat indistinguishable in appearance from one worn by a gay character in a popular movie. This has opened him up to ridicule on the internet, something he didn’t need given his previous faux pas. I would be willing to bet that, if his advisers and aides had it to do over, they would have him wearing a different overcoat.

  10. says

    The issue is that the governor records an advertisement bashing gays in which he is seen wearing an overcoat indistinguishable in appearance from one worn by a gay character in a popular movie. This has opened him up to ridicule on the internet

    …which, as Michael Heath points out, makes about as much sense as ridiculing the governor because both he and Heath Ledger were shown wearing jeans. That is, it’s far from clever. If you want to mock the Rick Perry ad, this parody is the way to do it.

  11. Michael Heath says

    slc1,

    My point is made in light of that which you claim I missed. I got that perfectly prior to Aquaria or you even bringing it up.

    The problem is that this jacket is not a defining feature of being gay while it is a defining feature of the group which Perry is directing his pander towards. So you and others bringing this up allows Perry’s crowed to justifiably ridicule you for being clueless about a defining feature of a large geographical area of the so-called fly-over states, helping them make an argument which resonates that liberals competently govern them since you don’t even know them. Using this argument is the equivalent of punching oneself in the face.

    People who hate gays while wearing Carhatt clothing are signaling their membership in rural America, not showing latent gay tendencies. Jeez . . .

  12. peterh says

    Then, to avoid real or imagined misdirection of his message, he ought to have appeared nude? Oh . . . just a minute . . . .

  13. slc1 says

    Re Michael Heath @ #13

    Apparently, Mr. Michael Heath’s position is that the ridicule that Governor Perry is receiving will, in fact, strengthen him with his core redneck support. The only problem is that those folks don’t visit the web sites, if they even surf the internet, where the ridicule is occurring. Thus it just adds to the general impression that the governor is a klutz.

    Now if the governor had been wearing the same coat in an advertisement where he was criticizing Governor Romney’s health car plan in Massachusetts, I doubt that it would have received anywhere near the amount of negative publicity. In fact, I doubt that anyone would have made the connection with the movie.

  14. carlsonjok says

    The only problem is that those folks don’t visit the web sites, if they even surf the internet, where the ridicule is occurring.

    What is life like living inside a smug cloud?

  15. Chris from Europe says

    Other than the comment about websites audiences, I’m with slc. I think you two (MH and carlsonjok) miss that the joke is not about the type of people that wear these jackets in general. People don’t assume that they are gay jackets. The joke is entirely about making an anti-gay video with such a similar appearance.

    I’m pretty sure that Carhartt offers more than one style for their jackets. Or is that exact color necessary to be able to pander to Middle America?

  16. Chris from Europe says

    @carlsonjok #18
    Given the type of people politicians like Perry and Palin represent, isn’t a certain level of ignorance simply self-preservation?

  17. The Christian Cynic says

    I have mixed feelings about this whole deal with Perry’s jacket. As a lifelong Illinoisan, I can attest that Carhartt is popular here (although I would contest its ubiquity, at least in central Illinois), and so Perry wearing the jacket is just to strike a down-home, rural pose for his likely audience. On the other hand, even though the style or brand of jacket certainly should not be universally associated with Heath Ledger having worn it in Brokeback, it is mildly amusing to me that someone pointed out the similarity. But beyond that amusement, no one need look any further into it – it’s just a funny coincidence.

  18. scorinth says

    Regarding the Carhartt issue, it really is a problem to say, “Oh, wow, he’s wearing that same jacket.” and make an issue of it. Let’s turn it around: In Philadelphia, Tom Hank’s character, being a lawyer, wears a business suit and neck tie. Imagine a sizable portion of the populace clucking excitedly over all those politicians wearing “those gay suits from Philadelphia”.
    No! I hope you can see how fucking ridiculous it would be to make that connection based on such common clothing. What it says to me, as a Kansas native, is that a lot of my fellow liberal atheists really are out of touch with the reality that a not insignificant portion, and that’s not a good thing to be saying.

  19. says

    Wrote a post about Rick Perry’s jacket. Hat tip to Michael Heath for the information on Carhartt and who wears it.

    On the actual topic of this thread…I wish we lived in a society where the subject of a politician engaging the services of a prostitute wasn’t a big deal in the slightest. It’s unfortunate that Republicans don’t feel the same way, since they seem to be the ones always getting caught doing it.

  20. carlsonjok says

    The joke is entirely about making an anti-gay video with such a similar appearance.

    It is only a funny-ha-ha to people who apparently mistake their own ignorance for some sort of superiority.

    Would it be funny if someone laughed at President Obama for criticizing Republicans while playing golf at a country club because, you know, rich white people play golf at country clubs? No, it wouldn’t. And doing the same thing to Rick Perry isn’t funny either just because he is an odious dunce.

  21. Chris from Europe says

    Scorinth, why are you all so sure that all liberal think Carhartts are gay jacket? Why are so sure that it isn’t the context of the ad that matters?

    Notify me when there’s an anti-gay video in which the person wears something similar to anything Tom Hanks wears in Philadelphia and in a setting that isn’t too far off of the movie’s.

  22. Chris from Europe says

    It is only a funny-ha-ha to people who apparently mistake their own ignorance for some sort of superiority.

    Huh? That’s simply bullshit. How do you come to such wild conclusions?

    If Obama makes an ad in which he plays Golf and, at the same time, makes this criticism, he and the responsible campaign team should be ridiculed and the team should be fired. You want to strip the context and misrepresent what is seen as funny in order to be insulted as a flyover American.

    I think the assumptions made about liberal coastal “elitists” here are quite surprising.

  23. carlsonjok says

    I think the assumptions made about liberal coastal “elitists” here are quite surprising.

    Bless your heart, you finally seem to be catching on.

  24. scorinth says

    “why are you all so sure that all liberal think Carhartts are gay jacket?”
    Because that’s what the joke is: “Doesn’t Rick Perry look like that gay guy?”
    Sure. Maybe. Possibly, he looks like that one gay character from a movie. Why? Because he’s wearing a tan Carhartt jacket in an outdoor setting. I dare you to give me some other reason somebody would make that connection. So what people who make that joke are saying is that Perry looks like that one gay guy from the movie, because of the jacket. So, the jacket makes the faggot, so to speak.

    PROTIP: The majority of people who work outdoors in the central and western US wear clothing that’s very similar to that same jacket. That’s not a small number. I’m talking hundreds of thousands. Probably millions. To completely gloss over their existence and jump straight to the gay character is offensive to me both as a gay man and as a Kansan.

  25. jameshanley says

    I wrote a blog post about Perry’s jacket, too. The riotous hilarity some seem to find in it really is revelatory of being out of touch with rural America.

    The only point on which I disagree with Michael Heath’s comments is that Perry was a farmer in Texas, so I suspect he’s been wearing a Carhartt coat since long before Brokeback Mountain was first pitched.

    Hell, Perry’s about as far down on my list of whom I’d vote for as anybody possibly could be, but even I see this as just provincialism among annoyingly smug urban liberals.

  26. scorinth says

    Eh, I should proofread more carefully. I forgot to respond to the challenge Chris from Europe gave me. I neglected to point to an actual example of a homophobic video with suits and ties because I brought it up as a hypothetical parallel. I didn’t say “I saw this video with suits and ties and homophobia…” I even used the word “Imagine” come on, you can read better than that.

  27. Chris from Europe says

    I dare you to give me some other reason somebody would make that connection.

    The joke isn’t simply that these things are given, but that the topic of the video for which he chose that is showing that he is as anti-gay as possible. If he would talk about eroding Medicare, it wouldn’t be funny for most people. (There are always a few and I bet it’s not based on locality.)

    To completely gloss over their existence and jump straight to the gay character is offensive to me both as a gay man and as a Kansan.

    I’m also gay, but not full of it. Do you have an actual real non-emotional argument why it’s offensive? And nobody glosses over their existence, it just doesn’t matter much in respect to the video Perry made. Or are outdoor workers defined by anti-gay hate and support for certain African regimes?

    I could write it as stupidly as you do:
    PROTIP: Outdoor workers owning similar jackets are not limited to your geography. Liberal America is not limited to California.

  28. scorinth says

    The joke isn’t simply that these things are given, but that the topic of the video for which he chose that is showing that he is as anti-gay as possible.

    Politicians say anti-gay things all the time. Homophobia isn’t funny. The joke doesn’t work without Perry looking like the gay character. So, the joke isn’t that he’s saying anti-gay things, it’s that he’s saying anti-gay things while looking like a gay character. Why does he look like a gay character? Because he’s wearing a tan Carhartt jacket in an outdoor setting. I could continue to address your point again, but I refer you to my post #28 above.

    I’m also gay, but not full of it.

    I’m not full of it, either. I brought up the fact that I’m gay and from Kansas solely to avoid the appearance of being offended on behalf of others. Truthfully, I’m not that annoyed by the joke. I’m annoyed that the people making the jokes don’t realize how out of touch they look.

    Do you have an actual non-emotional argument why it’s offensive?

    Offense is entirely an emotional thing. What empirical test can I do to establish offense? Carefully extract the chemical essence of insult and measure its properties?

    PPROTIP: Outdoor workers owning similar jackets are not limited to your geography. Liberal America is not limited to California.

    Two points: Cool, more people wear that jacket than I originally pointed out. This helps your argument how? From where I sit, that just makes the joke in question more absurd. Secondly, I never said liberal America is limited to California. If I implied it, I apologize for not making myself clear. However, perhaps the fact that I pointed out that I am a gay liberal from Kansas would indicate that I don’t hold the belief that you imply I do.

  29. Chris from Europe says

    Politicians say anti-gay things all the time.

    All the time? Really? Okay, maybe in Kansas. What followed the sentence is largely what I already wrote, but missing the important part: It’s not just the kind of the jacket in an outdoor setting. He could have used a different brown, etc. It’s the fact that he in many factors comes that close with this topic. (And I didn’t even watch the movie.)

    I think I already wrote that I don’t think simply wearing the jacket in an ad would be enough. But don’t having the sense to at least select a slightly different model for an anti-gay ad seems funny, especially given the general performance of Perry in his campaign. I doubt people making fun of the ad don’t get that it is designed to appeal to a certain subset of Americans.

    You could at least describe why you feel offended in a more detailed manner. You could also try to find an explanation for your emotion. Of course, just that someone is offended doesn’t mean that other people have to honor it.

    I’m annoyed that the people making the jokes don’t realize how out of touch they look.

    Of course, nobody who makes this claim here convincingly shows that these people are actually out of touch or. At least, you added “they look”. Does anyone really think people don’t know that it’s a normal way of clothing? (So what?)

    I wonder if the accusation of being out of touch makes much sense when it’s totally about emotions. So people with slightly different lives and perspectives cannot exactly relate to you. And? Where’s the problem?

    (And I’m certainly not urban.)

  30. says

    Does anyone really think people don’t know that it’s a normal way of clothing?

    Umm, yes. If it’s normal, there is nothing at all remarkable about it being worn both by a gay movie character and a homophobic politician. The fact that people are treating it as remarkable shows that they don’t know it’s normal.

  31. Chris from Europe says

    The fact that people are treating it as remarkable shows that they don’t know it’s normal.

    No, that doesn’t necessarily follow.

  32. scorinth says

    He could have used a different brown, etc. It’s the fact that he in many factors comes that close with this topic.

    Oooh, I see now! It’s not the Carhartt jacket that makes him look gay, it’s the brown Carhartt jacket that makes him look gay! That changes everyth- No wait. Same rebuttal still applies. I’m pretty sure it would apply pretty much no matter what it was that he wore. If he wore a suit, he’d look like the Tom Hanks character that I mentioned before. If he wore a button-down shirt with slacks, he’d look like any number of generic “sharp-dressed gay guy” characters from TV shows. If he wore a feather boa with sequins and heels… No, that one’s too silly. The point is that no matter what he wore, he’d look like some famous gay dude. Once you’ve reached that point, you have to recognize that the joke isn’t a joke about the irony of being homophobic while having a similar appearance to a gay character, it’s just a “gay joke”.

    Of course, nobody who makes this claim here convincingly shows that these people are actually out of touch or. At least, you added “they look”. Does anyone really think people don’t know that it’s a normal way of clothing? (So what?)

    The joke seems to rely on the instant recognizability of that color and style of jacket. The thing is, given that so many people dress up like that, why would somebody jump straight to Brokeback Mountain? I mean, if he wore a black rubber suit with cape and mask, sure, he’d definitely look like Batman. However, “brown carhartt jacket” is so fundamentally common and unremarkable that to make a joke connecting it to that particular character would lead people – or at least myself – to assume that the person making the joke has never visited the geographic and demographic sectors where the jackets are common, and instead gets their information from the movies about the area… That is to say, it makes people think you’re out of touch because you don’t recognize how unremarkable it is to see somebody wearing one of those. To return to my Philadelphia example: You have a popular movie portraying a gay character who dresses in a suit and tie. Somebody sees the movie and, instead of recognizing that the suit and tie is normal attire for professionals like lawyers, assumes that the outfit is somehow a marker of the gay nature of the character. Just how fantastically out of touch with culture does that person have to be to make that mistake?
    That’s exactly how out of touch you have to be to assume that the particular type of brown Carhartt jacket is significant of a gay man, as opposed to simply signifying a person who works outdoors, needs tough clothes that stand up to abuse, and likes that shade of brown.

    You could at least describe why you feel offended in a more detailed manner. You could also try to find an explanation for your emotion. Of course, just that someone is offended doesn’t mean that other people have to honor it.

    Fair enough. As a liberal, I don’t like it when fellow liberals misunderstand or appear to misunderstand social issues – even small ones like jokes about clothes. We’re liberals, man, we’re supposed to have a better awareness of society and the people around us. As a gay man, I don’t like it when part of a joke is “this man looks like he’s gay”. I get that the overall point is the irony involved, and not just the gayness, but it’s still there. As a Kansan, I certainly do feel like the more rural segments of our society are glossed over when a joke that’s getting a lot of “air-time” fundamentally misinterprets an article of clothing characteristic of that rural segment. (And I do know that they’re not just a country thing. Welders and other “mechanic” types love them, too.)
    Finally, I’m aware that nobody has to change their behavior because somebody is offended. Some people are offended that I even exist, and I’m certainly not changing that for their benefit. :)

  33. says

    Well, if they do know it’s normal and still see a joke there then they are not ignorant but instead have a terrible sense of humor for laughing at what’s normal. I’d rather be ignorant, to be honest.

  34. Chris from Europe says

    Oooh, I see now! It’s not the Carhartt jacket that makes him look gay, it’s the brown Carhartt jacket that makes him look gay!

    You can’t stay honest, hm? It’s obviously not making him look gay. It’s just ironic that in an attack ad against people that also includes the effort to pander to a certain subset he dons clothes everyone knows he doesn’t usually wear and comes really close to the promotion pictures of the movie. Somehow it must offend you so much that you have to lie and twist. And then you go on and try to strip the context … It’s just too stupid. I’ve had it.

  35. scorinth says

    You can’t stay honest, hm? . . . . Somehow it must offend you so much that you have to lie and twist. . . . I’ve had it.

    Sarcasm and friendly jibes are not the sort of thing I’d call “lying”. If they were, many or most FTB commenters would be liars. I really must go finish a paper myself, so we agree it’s best that we end here. Good day!

  36. carlsonjok says

    We’re liberals, man, we’re supposed to have a better awareness of society and the people around us.

    You would think, but apparently they don’t need to know us to know better than us.

  37. Chris from Europe says

    Well, I’ve found another thing worth responding to:

    I certainly do feel like the more rural segments of our society are glossed over

    Really? Aren’t they overrepresented compared to the share of the population? Of course, in the media there’s a clear focus on big cities or cities in general. Rural experience seems to be for more exotic television channels and sometimes the places are treated as an open-air zoo. But in politics rural states are clearly overrepresented.

    We’re liberals, man, we’re supposed to have a better awareness of society and the people around us.

    I think that the liberals here usually have no problem mocking the people around us that are easily and irrationally offended. I don’t see urban liberals being offended about jokes involving typical aspects of their lives and stereotypes, but usually being able of some self-deprecation.

  38. The Christian Cynic says

    Gretchen:

    Well, if they do know it’s normal and still see a joke there then they are not ignorant but instead have a terrible sense of humor for laughing at what’s normal. I’d rather be ignorant, to be honest.

    Okay, I feel obliged to defend my sense of humor given my earlier comment. (If you’re going to criticize my sense of humor, listen to some of my puns first.)

    For me, the humor is in the juxtaposition of Perry wearing a similar jacket to Ledger’s in Brokeback while filming an expressly anti-gay ad. There is also a degree of amusement that I take in the very notion that anyone associates the jacket itself with Ledger’s character in said movie, since it subverts the idea of heterosexual machismo that you know Perry aspires to in his public persona.

  39. Michael Heath says

    Chris from Europe:

    I’m pretty sure that Carhartt offers more than one style for their jackets. Or is that exact color necessary to be able to pander to Middle America?

    They offer multiple styles and colors. However the color Gov. Perry is wearing is the both the dominant color, by far, and the color which makes a Carthatt so distinguishable from other brands. In fact if you see this color and it’s not a Carhartt, it’s safe to assume it’s knock-off looking to leverage the Carhartt brand. It’s also important to note that at least in my area, it’s the overalls in that same color that are most observed. I happen to have two pairs.

    It also should also be pointed out again that if one were to focus on Gov. Perry wearing this jacket for the obvious reason of pandering, it’s that he’s clearly a poseur since this coat’s so immaculate. For most wearers, the unworn look ends after a couple of wears.

  40. dingojack says

    Maybe Lil’ Ricky shouldda worn something like this. No one would called him a Freind of Narnia is this fabulous outfit! :)
    Dingo

  41. dingojack says

    OK Michael let’s look at some numbers:
    Total rural population of America: ca. 56,381,768*
    Total world-wide sales of Brokeback Mountain: $180,343,761**
    Asumming $20 a ticket that’s ca. 9,

  42. dingojack says

    oops. Sorry about that.
    That’s ca. 9,017,188 tickets at the movies plus a further $31,345,343 in DVD sales (@ $5, say, another 6,269,067) or about 15,000,000. With all the ‘Oh Noes Teh Gayz’ nonsense let’s say that’s about 150,000,000 would be aware of the connection. Since about 50% of the sales of tickets were US domestc that’s about 75,000,000 people.
    So gain 56M to lose 75M.
    If you had been Perry’s handles what would you’ve advised? Hmmm?
    Dingo

  43. dingojack says

    Poot! Here are some footnotes!
    Dingo
    —–
    * CIA World factbook. United States of America.
    ** Sales figures from here

  44. says

    I think too much is being made of this by both sides. The similarity between the jackets is mildly amusing at best, but hardly some monumental bit of symbolism that deserves to be trumpeted to the ends of the earth. At the same time, I don’t think finding it mildly amusing makes one an effete, out of touch elitist either.

Leave a Reply