Krauthammer v Santorum on Marriage Equality »« Romney on Obama and Qaddafi

Roy Moore Considering Running Again

Judge Roy Moore says he’s considering running for office again — not for president, or for the governor of Alabama again, but to get his old job back as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. He was kicked off the court after refusing a federal court order to remove a huge Ten Commandments monument from the courthouse.

Judge Roy Moore said Tuesday he’s seriously considering running again for chief justice eight years after being kicked out of the job for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument.

Moore, 64, told The Associated Press in an exclusive interview that lots of people have encouraged him to enter the Republican primary and he expects to decide by Jan. 1.

Moore is a genuine theocrat with incredibly barbaric views. In one ruling involving a custody case where the mother was now a lesbian — which wasn’t even at issue in the case — Moore wrote a concurring opinion that was a long rant about why gay people are evil and the state must either put them in jail or put them to death. Here’s part of it:

Homosexuality is strongly condemned in the common law because it violates both natural and revealed law.   The author of Genesis writes: “God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him;  male and female He created them․ For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife;  and they shall become one flesh.” Genesis 1:27, 2:24 (King James). The law of the Old Testament enforced this distinction between the genders by stating that “[i]f a man lies with a male as he lies with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination.” Leviticus 20:13 (King James)…

To disfavor practicing homosexuals in custody matters is not invidious discrimination, nor is it legislating personal morality. On the contrary, disfavoring practicing homosexuals in custody matters promotes the general welfare of the people of our State in accordance with our law, which is the duty of its public servants. Providing for the common good involves maintaining a public morality through both our criminal and civil codes, based upon the principles that right conscience demands, without encroaching on the jurisdiction of other institutions and the declared rights of individuals.

The State may not interfere with the internal governing, structure, and maintenance of the family, but the protection of the family is a responsibility of the State. Custody disputes involve decision-making by the State, within the limits of its sphere of authority, in a way that preserves the fundamental family structure. The State carries the power of the sword, that is, the power to prohibit conduct with physical penalties, such as confinement and even execution. It must use that power to prevent the subversion of children toward this lifestyle, to not encourage a criminal lifestyle.

Comments

  1. Reginald Selkirk says

    lots of people have encouraged him to enter the Republican primary

    I wonder how many of them were Democrats.

  2. Larry says

    Boy, am I ever confused. With the whole article lined out, do I assume that it never happened, or that it happened and was then redacted?

  3. MikeMa says

    Judge Roy Moore is a bigoted, homophobic, doddering old fool. That he was ever a judge in any capacity speaks volumes about the culture that elected him. Georgia should be ashamed, not encouraging a lunatic to seek power.

  4. gshelley says

    Boy, am I ever confused. With the whole article lined out, do I assume that it never happened, or that it happened and was then redacted?

    A couple of other people have hinted at it, but I expect it is just the word “judge” that is supposed to have been struck out, as he was thrown off the bench

  5. Michael Heath says

    Ed merely failed to block his strike-out tag after “Judge”; unfortunately that’s the first word in the entire blog post.

  6. says

    @ MikeMa

    (Not a) Judge Roy Moore was Alabama’s.
    The sane among our state’s (Georgia) residents are still doing pennance for Neal Horsely the mule-fucker. Don’t make us pay for crimes for which we are not guilty.

  7. MikeMa says

    @fifthdentist,
    In my meager (and pointless) defense, both Georgia and Alabama seem quite similar from up north…

  8. says

    One word best describes Roy Moore, and that is dangerous. His argument drifts from biblical to civil matters in much the way an un-medicated street corner loony rants about conspiracies. He is dangerous for having any supporters at all. If he attracts Tea Party activists by spewing a few Fox news talking points, he might get elected. Let’s hope not.

  9. kermit. says

    An incredibly barbaric(1) and stupid(2) bully(3). A sexually obsessed theocrat(4). I can’t decide if he is a worse man than he is a judge, or vice versa.

    (1) Executing someone for having the wrong sexual desires?
    (2) He should understand that US law is not derived from biblical law. I do not see how he could get as far as state SC chief justice without understanding the difference between what is and what he desires.
    (3) He clearly loves punishing people, and seeks excuses for it.
    (4) Redundant, I know.

  10. says

    This:

    “ARTICLE XV.
    OATH OF OFFICE.

    Section 1. All members of the general assembly, and all officers, executive and judicial, before they enter upon the execution of the duties of their respective offices, shall take the following oath or affirmation, to wit:
    “I,………., solemnly swear (or affirm, as the case may be) that I will support the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of the State of Alabama, so long as I continue a citizen thereof; and that I will faithfully and honestly discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter, to the best of my ability. So help me God.”
    Which oath may be administered by the presiding officer of either house of the general assembly, or by any officer authorized by law to administer an oath.”

    is from here (http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/constitutions/1875/1875_15and16.html).

    I’d say it would be a slamdunk to re-impeach the fucking p.o.s. about 24 hours–or less–after he takes the oath.

  11. abb3w says

    “It’s not legislating PERSONAL morality, it’s saying society considers teh ghay to be icky.”

    The ruling is marginally less egregious than it first looks; the ruling was written in February 2002, when sodomy was illegal in Alabama as in much of the south. Lawrence v. Texas didn’t strike down sodomy laws until 2003, and even then may theoretically be allowed insofar as they are nondiscriminatory in definition and application (prosecuting hetero sodomy as frequently). Contrariwise, since not all gay sex is oral or anal (some is more accurately frottage), and lesbian tribadism also doesn’t involve oral/genital or anal/genital contact and thus may not fall within the statutory definition of “deviant sexual intercourse”, even then it was incorrect to presume that a sexually active gay/lesbian lifestyle was ipso facto criminal.

    And even then, oral and anal sex are only a felony under Alabama law when one of the participants is well underage, incapable of consent, or forced; otherwise, it’s a class A misdemeanor.

    That said, given how common heterosexual oral sex is nowadays, this is a STUPID law.

  12. The Lorax says

    @13,

    The best part of that is that he’s swearing to God to uphold a law that he claims is ungodly.

    Oh, the shenanigans~

  13. says

    Homosexuality is strongly condemned in the common law because it violates both natural and revealed law.

    This line alone should have been enough to get him impeached. It’s a blatant rejection of our system of law in favor of “natural” and “revealed” law, which is to say, shit he makes up, or shit he thinks is in the Bible.

  14. fastlane says

    If he runs again, it would be yet Moore (see what I did there?) evidence that god loves you and wants you to be happy, Ed.

  15. sosw says

    That said, given how common heterosexual oral sex is nowadays, this is a STUPID law.

    I’d say that such a law would be stupid even if it weren’t common.

    The fact that it’s common just makes it quite hypocritical to try to enforce in some cases.

  16. abb3w says

    sosw:

    I’d say that such a law would be stupid even if it weren’t common.

    Well, yes; but there’s stupid laws, and then there’s STUPID laws.

  17. quagmire says

    In my meager (and pointless) defense, both Georgia and Alabama seem quite similar from up north…

    Take away Atlanta and Georgia IS Alabama. But not quite Mississippi.

Leave a Reply