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Aug 22 2011

Markuze/Mabus Getting Psychological Evaluation

The latest update on David Mabus/Dennis Markuze:

Known online as “David Mabus”, Dennis Markuze of St. Laurent has been charged with uttering death threats and for criminally harassing seven victims.

Two charges were laid against him Wednesday — and an additional 14 were added on Friday.


They could keep charging him forever if they wanted to. There are dozens and dozens of us who have received his death threats over the years.

Markuze has been sent for a 30-day psychological evaluation at Montreal’s Pinel Institute and will appear in court again on Sept. 19.

Gee, I wonder what that will find. He’s mentally ill, that’s obvious. And ordinarily I’d have some sympathy for that, but that’s a little hard to do with a guy who’s been threatening your life. Ultimately I only care about his behavior, not why he engages in it. Regardless of why he does it, he needs to be locked up so he doesn’t act on his threats.

21 comments

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  1. 1
    Aquaria

    It’s so sad, but I’m with you on having him locked up. It was only a matter of time before someone got hurt.

    His “apologies” were creepy and disgusting.

  2. 2
    Hank Fox

    I wonder if the details of his evaluation will be made public?

  3. 3
    Bronze Dog

    About the only thing I have left to wonder about is what label will be applied to his specific type of crazy. I’m not versed in enough psychology to speculate from an arm chair, though.

  4. 4
    Nomen Nescio

    it’s pretty much guaranteed the results of that evaluation will be kept private, since they’ll almost certainly be considered medical records. still, whether he’s allowed to walk free or not will give us some indication as to the outcome.

  5. 5
    Chuck C

    I wonder if the details of his evaluation will be made public?

    I certainly frickin’ hope not. That information is about as personal and confidential as you can get. Markuze is mentally ill and is receiving much needed help. That his illness caused him to be a gigantic asshat does not abrogate his rights.

  6. 6
    Matt

    I think it is wonderful that the pressure exerted by petition and emails as a result of people like you making this an issue online resulted in positive change.

    Maybe we can do the same with regards to Bountiful.

  7. 7
    Bronze Dog

    For the people speaking up for medical privacy: You’re right. I do have a morbid curiosity about what condition(s) he’d be diagnosed as, but it shouldn’t be allowed to leak to the public.

  8. 8
    tbell

    Although it borders on self-evident that he is mentally ill to a greater or lesser degree, the mere fact that he issued apologies when faced with being caught illustrates that he clearly knows right from wrong. IANL, but isn’t that what’s required in order to be declared fit to stand trial?

  9. 9
    MattShizzle

    He’s defintely insane. I first encounterd him online around 2005. He’s been getting worse lately and appearing on more and more places. He gets banned from a website and just makes socks to come back. He even makes socks on sites that are unmoderated, or virtually so, just because he’s so used to being quickly banned. He certainly needs medication. I obviously can’t diagnose him, but my best guess is he’s a paranoid schizophrenic (I have a BS in psychology.)

  10. 10
    Dr X

    Although it borders on self-evident that he is mentally ill to a greater or lesser degree, the mere fact that he issued apologies when faced with being caught illustrates that he clearly knows right from wrong. IANL, but isn’t that what’s required in order to be declared fit to stand trial?

    Fit to stand trial: Ability in the present to understand the charges and cooperate with counsel. From what I’ve read, more emphasis is placed on the latter in Canadian courts.

    Knowing right from wrong at the time the act(s) was committed pertains to insanity/culpability verdict.

  11. 11
    Wes

    I agree with the people who say that his hasty apologies show that, whatever mental illness he may have, he understands that what he did was wrong. I don’t know how this relates to the charges against him (I’m no legal expert). But at least on a philosophical and moral level, it seems to me that if he understands that something is wrong, and did it anyways, he can be held morally accountable for it.

  12. 12
    Hank Fox

    “…the mere fact that he issued apologies when faced with being caught illustrates that he clearly knows right from wrong.”

    Regarding the motivation for an apology:

    Every teenager — and likely every man ever involved in a relationship — knows the motivation of “knowing right from wrong” can come second to “hoping it will get you off the hook.”

  13. 13
    Hank Fox

    I do like the fact that the news reports are now using his actual name. Early on, I was suspicious of them for not using it, but maybe it was just taking time for cautious media to verify the information already in hand.

  14. 14
    harold

    I agree with the people who say that his hasty apologies show that, whatever mental illness he may have, he understands that what he did was wrong.

    This is technically incorrect. A person could apologize later, yet still have been legally insane at the time of their action. Indeed, they could apologize while legally insane.

    This individual is severely mentally ill and very unlikely to have any significant financial resources. He is likely to be required to be supervised, at least to some degree, for the indefinite future, possibly the rest of his life.

    His behavior, while mentally ill, violated the rights of others. There is a natural desire to see him criminally or civilly punished in some way.

    However, that may or may not be part of the solution, depending on the findings of psychiatric and legal experts.

    The most important thing is that he is treated in the manner that most effectively and humanely prevents this type of behavior in the future. Some sort of civil or criminal penalty may or may not be part of that.

    I’m sure we’re all glad that he is currently being treated, rather than subjected untreated to criminal penalties, as could hypothetically happen in some jurisdictions. Criminal penalties without treatment would at best be ineffective and might well make him more dangerous.

  15. 15
    michael

    My prediction:

    Whatever happens – Within two days of his release he will be back on the computer sending out spam.

  16. 16
    Michael Heath

    Michael states:

    Whatever happens – Within two days of his release he will be back on the computer sending out spam.

    Well, I don’t think it will be two days. So let’s start a pool on long it will take!!! :)

  17. 17
    Aquaria

    Although it borders on self-evident that he is mentally ill to a greater or lesser degree, the mere fact that he issued apologies when faced with being caught illustrates that he clearly knows right from wrong.

    Not necessarily.

    Various serial killers and other assorted sadistic criminals have apologized to families of their victims. Many of them have expressed regret for their actions, and even gratitude for being stopped. But it’s bullshit, because they are almost always sociopaths/psychopaths, and nearly all of them are classic manipulators. Lying is what they do, and they’re almost as good at it as politicians.

    You can be mentally ill (surely no one seriously thinks Ted Bundy wasn’t?), know on some level that your behavior has been wrong, and still have no real regrets for what you did. Ted Bundy didn’t.

    Sadly, Mabus/Markuze’s apologies stink of a similar false contrition. IANAPsychiatrist, but I seriously doubt Mabus/Markuze has any real regrets. Instead, it’s most likely that he’s merely aping a behavior that got him out of jams in the past, clutching at a straw that he hopes will save him. This is how pathological deviants remember behavior, not from any real sense of empathy, but for how it works for them.

  18. 18
    Mike Crichton

    Aquaria: Those particular pathological deviants are still considered to be fit to stand trial and be punished, though.

  19. 19
    W. H. Heydt

    Has it even been definitely established that Markuze sent the “apologies” himself, and that it wasn’t someone his (his mother?) doing so on his behalf, whether he wanted them sent or not?

    –W. H. Heydt

    Old Used Programmer

  20. 20
    Raging Bee

    Since this psych evaluation is being done as part of a criminal-justice proceeding, I’m pretty sure at least some bits of it HAVE to be made public at some point. At least it would be if he were to plead insanity, or was deemed unfit to stand trial. This isn’t a guy seeking help on his own; it’s the state determining his condition for purposes of administering justice. IANAE, but I’m pretty sure the rules of confidentiality don’t apply at this point. If he’s ordered to undergo treatment as part of a sentence or plea agreement, then the rules of confidentiality will apply to his actual treatment (mostly — there will still be a public determination at some time as to whether he’s “cured” yet).

  21. 21
    Raging Bee

    Insane or not, I think a certain amount of public humiliation would be a very good deterrent to others like him; and possibly a necessary part of his own long-term treatment. I think that people like Markuze care, at the very least, about their own image; and if they thought they might have their arrogant threats and other posturing and puffery held up in public while they’re locked up and treated as ineffectual incompetent losers, they’d probably shut up and stay under their respective rocks.

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