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Feb 14 2014

Religion Means “This Law Doesn’t Apply To You”

My religion won’t allow it!
We consider it a sin!
If a gay man wants to shop here,
Why, I dare not let him in!
It’s infringement on my liberty—
Repression at its worst—
You’re a bigot, if you force me
Not to be a bigot first!

I’d kill animals humanely—
All my cattle, sheep, and goats—
But the Torah says, specifically,
I have to slit their throats
I’m opposed to simple stunning
But that’s all the law allows
All I want is my exception,
For my right to torture cows!

I’m just looking for a loophole;
There are laws I won’t obey!
I believe in equal treatment,
Sure, but not if someone’s gay!
It’s my right—well, it’s my privilege,
It’s my “free expression” clause
To read, “Only if you want to”
When interpreting the laws

From the first link:

The bill notes that businesses can refuse services and goods only if it furthers a civil union, domestic partnership, or same-sex marriage. The person or business would just have to say it was against their religion. For example, if a same-sex couple wanted a cake for their wedding reception, a bakery could refuse to cater to them.

But… good news!

Tennessee State Sen. Brian Kelsey (R-Germantown) suddenly pulled his sponsorship of the so-called “Turn the Gays Away” bill on Thursday after the controversial proposal was subject to national attention.

From the second link above:

The Danish government has banned shechita, saying “animal rights come before religion”.

Denmark’s Agriculture and Food Minister Dan Jørgensen yesterday signed a regulation preventing Danish slaughterhouses from applying for an exemption to pre-stunning, which effectively bans any religious slaughter in the country.

President of the European Jewish Congress, Dr Moshe Kantor, said: “This attack on basic Jewish religious practice in Denmark puts into question the continuance of community life in the country and follows strongly on the heels of persistent attacks on Jewish circumcision.

Really, though, doesn’t it sound completely reasonable, that you shouldn’t have to follow a law if you really, really, really don’t want to?

8 comments

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  1. 1
    CatMat

    If religion just adds to your limits
    Or possibly those of your kind
    Feel free to impose
    On yourself, but then those
    Who believe not, need really not mind.

    If your creed does entitle you further
    Than it does those who have no such claim
    You can try to ignore
    The mores and the law
    But you still have to shoulder the blame.

  2. 2
    Gregory in Seattle

    “Religious rights” really means, “Screw civil law, I don’t want to follow it.”

  3. 3
    gardengnome

    I think they should pass his bill, but add a clause that forces any business taking advantage to have a prominent sign advertising the fact.

  4. 4
    Cuttlefish

    But of course, there are a significant number of people who would patronize those businesses just to support that choice.

  5. 5
    Pliny the in Between

    Yes but Cuttlefish, it’s not really discrimination if you are working to save their souls…

    http://pictoraltheology.blogspot.com/2013/11/you-say-tomato.html

  6. 6
    gardengnome

    “But of course, there are a significant number of people who would patronize those businesses just to support that choice.”

    Granted, but their numbers are declining every year and it seems to me that most people are basically decent and would disapprove, taking their business elsewhere. Or perhaps I’m just a hopeless optimist…

  7. 7
    Matt G

    What arrogance! My religious rules trump your secular laws. Please, religious people, go form your own country and leave us sane people with our civilization intact.

  8. 8
    Alverant

    This needs to be put to music.

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