Defining the Supernatural vs. Logical Positivism

In working slowly through a gigantic backlog of blog comments, I met with one that goes back to an old school question, about my project to demarcate the natural and the supernatural. The comment by Enlightenment Liberal is here. He is asking questions about the conclusion I argued here and in print here (with a followup here). The first, Defining the Supernatural, supports the others, Defining Naturalism I and II. His perspective can be summarized as “If we grant your definitions of ‘natural’ and ‘supernatural’, I think that all hypotheses of the form ‘X is supernatural’ entail absolutely zero observable predictions about the world,” in particular because “I think that I have absolutely no basis to conclude that there is any relation or correlation at all between the fundamental nature of things and the observable nature of things,” in accordance with Logical Positivism.

So, is he right? Let’s explore… [Read more…]

Peter Boghossian on Gay Pride and Hobnobbing with an Online Misogynist

Yesterday I posted an enhanced edition of my Ohio speech on feminism. Today I am posting key material from my Portland speech that extends the same argument to a broader application, focusing on some of the recent public statements of Peter Boghossian… [Read more…]

Appearing All Over Southern California Next Week

Photograph of a building fronted by a beautiful waterfall backed by palm trees on the campus of the College of the Desert in Palm Desert California.I will be appearing to speak at numerous venues in Southern California next week and the following week. And of course selling and signing my books. I might also be available for hanging out with nice folk over drinks now and again while I’m around there. Here is the breakdown…

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Join My New Course This March: Naturalism as a Worldview

Logo for Partners for Secular Activism. The letters PSA in blue, in an art decco font, over a light grey watermark of a compass pointing near to north, all on a white backround.My most popular courses I now offer yearly, and this is one of them. Back by popular demand, I am teaching my online course on naturalism as a philosophy and worldview this March (just a few weeks away): Naturalism as a Worldview: How to Build a Sound Philosophy of Life.

Learn about all aspects of naturalism as a philosophy of life, and how to use it in practical ways, and improve on it, to develop a better personal philosophy of life, the world, and everything. In the process you will learn many of the basics of college-level philosophy, and how to think like a philosopher, an important skill for those who know religion is bunk, but that we still need a better way of understanding ourselves and the world.

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Join My New Course This January: Critical Thinking in the 21st Century

Starting January 1 (2015) I will be teaching an online course on Critical Thinking in the 21st Century: Essential Skills Everyone Should Master. Click that to register.

The required course text (which students should purchase as soon as possible) is Ken Manktelow, Thinking and Reasoning: An Introduction to the Psychology of Reason, Judgment and Decision Making (available in paperback … or on kindle for either purchase or rent: make sure you select the desired option before purchase). All other course materials (articles and video lectures) will be provided for free.

Official Course Description:

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Get Greta Christina’s Essential Little Book on Death

Cover of the e-book, with the title and author, depicting a person sitting contemplating below a great tree.When Greta Christina writes a book on a subject, it’s usually so thorough and well-written you won’t need any other. And her latest e-book (eventually to appear in print as well) continues the tradition. In less than eighty pages, Comforting Thoughts About Death That Have Nothing to Do with God covers every essential base, and is really the book for an atheist to get for building a usable philosophy of death. I couldn’t think of anything she didn’t address, and she even addressed some aspects of the question that would never have occurred to me!

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Appearing in Columbus, Ohio — and on DC TV!

While I continue to work all day in the studio recording audio for On the Historicity of Jesus (thanks to Pitchstone Publishing), while Sheffield continues working to produce an electronic edition (that process is out of my hands), I have to get some announcements out. I know, I still haven’t gotten to the comments queue. Have not found the time yet. And with Thanksgiving coming up as well, it certainly won’t happen this week.

But meanwhile, those who want to hang out with me in person, or see me on cable access TV, get out your December calendars…

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What Will Ryan Bell Decide? Join Our Exciting New Online Course in December

Ryan Bell shall soon be ending his Year Without God. And in a special one month online course, he and I will be debating where he should now go from here: Remain an atheist, or a theist? Join the atheist community and help us move the cause forward, or not? (He may have criticisms of the atheism movement worth your being challenged by.) He will be making the best case he thinks possible for belief in God; and I, the contrary. You can join us to watch how the arguments between us go, and even join in the discussion, and attempt to persuade him, yea or nay. Register now. And buy the two recommended course texts as soon as possible, if you want to see where we will be coming from (see below).

We have structured the course to run two arguments in parallel:

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Take My October Class: Moral Reasoning from Theory to Practice (Applying Science and Philosophy in Everyday Life)

This will be a survey of contemporary moral theory and the scientific study of morality, with an aim to improving your own moral decision-making, and encouraging the same in others. Register now. It’s a one-month, online, do-at-your-own-pace course in which you can participate as much or as little as you want. Lots of people just lurk, do the readings, and read the ensuing discussions, and that’s totally fine. But there will also be challenging assignment questions each week that will help you grasp and benefit from the readings and discussions, for anyone who wants to take that additional step.

Subjects covered in this course will include:

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