For ALL


Hey look at that – via the American Humanist Association

Photo: Taken from a 1940's Justice Society Of America comic before "Under God" was added to the pledge. </p>
<p>http://hmn.st/1iDx1ft

Notice the huge emphasis on “ALL” – in the 1940s, when racism and sexism and homophobia were barely on anyone’s radar, even the people oppressed by one or all of them.

But also notice the pre-McCarthy absence of that deity guy.

Comments

  1. Stacy says

    What a bunch of commie atheist pinkos!!

    (A little before my time, but my understanding is that after the war, as information about the Holocaust spread, awareness of racism began to seep more into popular culture and show up on the mainstream radar (think of films like Gentleman’s Agreement (1947), Giant (1956). The latter even had a proto-feminist theme. But anyhoo–point taken.)

  2. Blanche Quizno says

    When my dad was in the Navy ( he was born in ’32 so this would have been ca. 1950 – pre McCarthy but not by much), he says that the salute to the flag for the Pledge of Allegiance was the arm extended straight out, hand palm up and held about forehead high. But they changed it because it looked too much like the Nazi salute (which was the same, only palm down). Notice the military salute in the comic – it appears they hadn’t yet transitioned to the modern hand-over-heart standard.

  3. latsot says

    I wonder if the superhero on the right later regretted the choice of lederhosen for a superhero costume.

  4. johnthedrunkard says

    The ‘ur-pledge’
    I pledge allegiance to my flag
    And to the republic for which it stands,
    One nation, indivisible, with
    Liberty, equality, and justice for all.

    ‘My Flag’ was dumped in 1917, someone might have a German, Austrian, or Turkish flag in their pocket.
    Of course, we can thank McCarthy era Knights of Columbus ‘activism’ for ‘god.’
    ‘Equality’ didn’t make it past the early drafts. Couldn’t encourage those uppity women and darkies, could we?

    The Frank Capra ‘Why We Fight’ documentaries include footage of school kids reciting the pre-1954 pledge. It is a powerful moment.

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