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Aug 12 2012

A Reflection on Three Years of Blogging

The way all good things begin.

Three years ago today, I inaugurated this blog with its first post. At one point in it, I explained that I’d moved to WordPress.com and started a new blog because of issues with my previous host, and I wrote this:

I thought about buying my own domain and not messing around with that stuff anymore, but then I thought, wait a minute. Nobody actually reads what I write, anyway. Why pay for the privilege of writing it?

Well. Three years later, I have my own domain name. I also have a modest following of both friends and strangers, and the blog now gets hundreds (sometimes thousands) of views a day.

A lot of other things have changed since then, and they’ve all impacted my writing. I started college, developed severe depression, got diagnosed, got treatment, and recovered. I did a political 180 and became a passionate progressive. I dropped journalism as a major, picked up psychology, and chose the field of mental healthcare as a career. I gained weight and cut my hair short. I left a serious relationship.

In general, there is very little in common between the person who wrote that first post and the person who is writing this one today.

I’ve learned a lot from writing this blog. I’ve become a better writer, obviously, but I’ve also learned how to argue better, how to take things with a grain of salt, and how to remove myself from the world when I need to.

I’ve learned that calm and careful writing fares better among the commentariat, but that there is a place for snark and anger. Sometimes I’m fucking angry. Sometimes I have the right to be.

I’ve learned that what they tell you about women who are both seen and heard isn’t true. The adults in my life warned me of all sorts of things–that people would dislike me, that men wouldn’t date me, that employers wouldn’t hire me–if I kept up this blog. I’ve certainly lost friends through my writing–well, I’ve lost “friends”–and it’s certainly made things awkward sometimes. I don’t really care.

But these days, most of my genuine friends are people I met through writing. Some of them knew my writing before they even knew me in person, which is interesting. I get messages all the time from friends and from people I barely know or not at all: “I read what you wrote about depression…can we talk?” “My boss keeps making sexist jokes. Do you have any advice?”

I’ve learned that doing what you love will set you free. In my case, it set me free from unhealthy friendships and relationships, from depression, from a terrible career path, and from the feeling of being powerless and insignificant. Three years ago I had no voice. Today, I do. And I use it meaningfully.

I’ve learned to do things for myself and for my own benefit. Not for friends and family, not for lovers, not for teachers–and not just for my resume, either. I write because it’s a joy. I write now for the same reasons I did when I was a kid–because I love to. (I wrote my first creative thing when I was three years old, and it was a song about cement trucks, which were my favorite vehicles at the time–clearly I never really did the whole girl thing properly.)

I’ve learned that, to put it mildly, haters gonna hate. There have been people who seem to be offended by the mere existence of this blog. There have also been people who find everything I write here to be a personal insult to them, and yet they continue reading it day in and day out. This is something I have yet to understand about people. Why not just leave?

I’ve learned that apathy doesn’t get you anywhere. It’s so fashionable and the pressure to cultivate it (or at least learn to fake it) is so high, but nothing good has ever come to me through not giving a fuck. I care deeply about things, people, ideas. I think that’s my strength as a writer and as a person.

I used to be so quiet. I used to tread so carefully. Not much scares me anymore, and the opinions of others matter little.

Blogging gave me an identity, and the whole process is a joy–from the first spark of an idea to getting to a computer, wringing it all out, checking the facts, linking to the sources, reading everything over, giving it a title, pressing “Publish,” taking a break, doing it all over again.

Hopefully for many more years.

8 comments

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  1. 1
    Author

    Beautiful. I got teary.

    1. 1.1
      Miri, Professional Fun-Ruiner

      Thanks dear. :)

  2. 2
    linkeech

    Thanks for sharing that, blogging is an unusual medium for me at times. Personally I can identify with gains from personal reflections that you talk about. For me reflecting on our journeys and personal ideologies and questioning ourselves makes us stronger, more accepting and fuller human beings, your right with the apathy line too! – Keep up the Great Work…

  3. 3
    prithviinspire

    Thanks for sharing a wonderful information. However as you said, blogging is making us more beneficial if you write for you. If we are ready to write on what we love and what we think that’s make a big difference in blogging.

  4. 4
    Beckie Smith

    Thanks for sharing :) this has quickly become one of my favourite blogs. Even in the short time since I came across it, reading your blog has made me want to be a better writer and a better blogger. That’s pretty awesome. I tend not to say things like this very often so I really hope it doesn’t sound disingenuous! I hope I’ll be able to say something similar in a couple of years’ time.

    1. 4.1
      Miri, Professional Fun-Ruiner

      Thank you so much! That means a lot. I love your blog too and I’m glad I found it. :D

  5. 5
    Lyla

    Congrats! You are a good role model for this almost 35 year-old with my 6 month old blog, just learning and in some cases re-learning those important lessons you spoke about.

    1. 5.1
      Miri, Professional Fun-Ruiner

      Thank you so much! :)

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