Evangelists panic when they’re losing ground

Hark, for I’m going to tell you a tale of olden times. Back in the days of yore, when our lives were little better than those of the cavemen, there were no podcasts. In those days, all we had for entertainment on long drives was an archaic device known as “The Radio.” On this radio, I used to listen to a lot of Christian shows, with my favorite being “The Bible Answer Man” with Hank Hanegraaff.

In these more enlightened times, I have so much regular entertainment to choose from that I can easily fill all my driving time and more with shows which confirm my own personal beliefs and prejudices, and much of the time I do. But when Beth asked her Facebook friends what fundie podcasts she could listen to last week, it reminded me. How is Hank doing? I really should start listening again.

And I’m so glad I did. Because if I hadn’t listened to the August 1 episode, I never would have run into this great article by Jerry Coyne. It’s titled: “As atheists know, you can be good without God.”

To put it mildly, Hank did not like this article.

Here are a few excerpts.

…[I]t’s clear that even for the faithful, God cannot be the source of morality but at best a transmitter of some human-generated morality.

This isn’t just philosophical rumination, because God — at least the God of Christians and Jews — repeatedly sanctioned or ordered immoral acts in the Old Testament. These include slavery (Leviticus 25:44-46), genocide (Deuteronomy 7:1-2; 20:16-18), the slaying of adulterers and homosexuals, and the stoning of non-virgin brides (Leviticus 20:10, 20:13, Deuteronomy 22:20-21).

Was God being moral when, after some children made fun of the prophet Elisha’s bald head, he made bears rip 42 of them to pieces (2 Kings 2:23-24)? Even in the New Testament, Jesus preaches principles of questionable morality, barring heaven to the wealthy (Matthew 19:24), approving the beating of slaves (Luke 12:47-48), and damning sinners to the torments of hell (Mark 9:47-48). Similar sentiments appear in the Quran.

Should we be afraid that a morality based on our genes and our brains is somehow inferior to one handed down from above? Not at all. In fact, it’s far better, because secular morality has a flexibility and responsiveness to social change that no God-given morality could ever have.

Sentiments I think most of us can get behind, but that’s no big surprise, right? Most of you readers are on Jerry Coyne’s side, as I am.

Now I don’t know if you’ve ever heard Hank Hanegraaff, but he’s got this very calm, very soothing voice, with what I would describe as almost a Jim Henson-like quality. He sounds reassuring, authoritative, certain of his facts. Most of the time.

On this particular occasion, as he talked about the terrible injustice of Coyne’s article, he just kept getting more and more agitated. He didn’t actually refute these claims about the Bible, mind you — he threw them out there, dismissed them by saying they were “out of context,” and then said he’d go over them in depth on another day. Which I loved, because there’s no more effective way to stoke an opposing argument than to repeat it without refuting it properly.

By the time he was done with the subject, Hank was doing a passable impression of Yosemite Sam, bringing up the usual red herrings like Mao Zedong and Pol Pot (even implying that Pol Pot was just a humanist trying earnestly to set up an “egalitarian society,” which made me say “WTF?”)

The best line of the show, however, was when Hank said in a voice of grave and sorrowful concern: “The thing that I find particularly troubling about this article… is that when you read it without discernment skills, you can end up believing it.”

Dead on, Hank. Of course, with proper analysis, it’s even more plausible. But I think Jerry Coyne should graciously accept the compliment that his rhetoric is so good that people without discernment skills are more likely to accept his reasoning than the Bible stories that they usually take as a given.

That’s what bugs evangelists about the internet in general. They’re used to stating their case in a vacuum. When someone like Hank Hanegraaff says, as he did to a caller later in the show, “God loves you so much that He sent His son to die for you,” he’s counting on the assumption that some rude and dickish atheist isn’t going to pop up and ask something like “How do you know that?” And when they solemnly proclaim that only God makes you moral, they hate it when you point to passages where Jesus endorses beating your slaves.

Similar sentiments abound these days; just a few weeks ago, Josh McDowell was saying that “The Internet has given atheists, agnostics, skeptics, the people who like to destroy everything that you and I believe, the almost equal access to your kids as your youth pastor and you have… whether you like it or not.”

Equal access? That’s what we’re gaining that’s so terrifying? Apparently religion can only thrive if they can muzzle the atheists, shut them up, shame them into not making a peep while we’re being slandered.

Keep on scaring them, folks.