Gamers, get ready for Left Behind 2

Alert Non-Prophets listener “Rasputin” sent me this valuable information:

Greetings Unprophets,

After your recent lengthy hiatus I realized I just can’t get enough and with a lack of other listening material I decided to take a stroll through the archives.

…During the March 24, 2007 episode there was a story about the stock price of Left Behind Games hitting eighteen cents and someone questioned parenthetically “Weren’t they going to put out a sequel?”

To assuage my rampant curiosity on this issue I decided to make an offering to the Great Lord Google and what do I find?

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Left-Behind-Games-Inc-Inspired-Media-Entertainment-1001802.html

Not only did they make a sequel but they released it yesterday making this insanely topical. Clearly my yearnings for the dulcet rantings of Jeff Dee were divinely inspired.

According to this press release the first game is “known as the most widely distributed Christian PC game in history.” I think that’s kind of like cruising for chicks in the maternity ward because you know they put out. It may be technically true but is missing quite a bit of the big picture. And by quite a bit I mean all.

I never did get around to playing the first Left Behind game, because the reviews were so awful it sounded painful to play even for camp value. This time will probably be no different, but I look forward to hearing whether they managed to remain utterly tone-deaf when we see how many flaws that were pointed out remain unfixed.

Kirk Cameron, ACTOR!

I want to give a shout out to this great post on Slacktivist. Fred has been doing a long critique of the “Left Behind” series of books, and he’s recently turned to the first movie as a break from reading.

I thoroughly enjoyed his merciless critique of Kirk Cameron as an actor. Here’s just a taste:

This is where Cameron confesses that he doesn’t believe or understand that virtue is a craft and craft is a virtue. Cameron describes his life before his conversion:

“There was this aching, empty feeling that left me very disillusioned with the business I was working in,” he says. “What else was there? What else did I have to shoot for? I’d basically reached the top of the ladder, and I was 18.”

He had “reached the top of the ladder,” Cameron said. And he still seems to believe that this is true.

That’s an astonishing thing for him to believe when you realize that at this same time he was being introduced to the newest member of Growing Pains’ cast: Leonardo DiCaprio.

Now certainly DiCaprio’s work as Luke Brower-Seaver, the show’s Cousin Oliver, wasn’t on the same level as the quality of work he would later go on to do, but he was already clearly a talented and committed actor. Just one year after Growing Pains was canceled he was astonishingly good in What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, so I think it’s safe to assume that he was already an obviously better actor than Cameron at the time they worked together.

So for at least one year of his professional life, then, Kirk Cameron was confronted, regularly, by an example of what a real actor his own age should look like. And yet he spent all that time on the same set with and in the same scenes as DiCaprio without apparently learning anything — without even seeming to realize that he needed to learn anything.

I really have to admire how much this post hit the nail on the head in terms of what bothers me about many Christian testimonials — often they are simply incredibly arrogant about how successful they supposedly were before their conversion. The whole thing about how “I had everything, and I felt so empty.” Come on, seriously. There’s always more you can do. You never have everything. Especially if “everything” to you is being an actor with the talent level of Kirk freaking CAMERON. (I neither endorse nor reject Fred’s opinion about Leonardo, however.)