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Category Archive: current events

Jun 17 2009

Come on, John Ensign…you’re not trying!

The latest hilarious story of a politician with a roving willy is that of Nevada Republican senator John Ensign, who has shamefacedly confessed to an extramarital affair. Like the disgraced Democratic New York governor Eliot Spitzer, Ensign is your garden variety moral hypocrite, with an extra special twist that makes the schadenfreude at his downfall …

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Apr 12 2009

Reflections on a lazy Sunday

Apparently the Christians had some big holiday today. I thought today would be a good day to gaze upon all the signs and wonders in this big wide world of ours and make an assessment of just how vividly their God is — um — making his presence known. Or not. Well, somebody must have …

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Mar 31 2009

Well, it’s nice to know she’s not nuts or anything

By now this story, about some pathetic cult member who has pled guilty to the starvation death of her infant son provided the charges are dropped once he comes back to life (a condition I imagine the DA’s office gleefully agreed to), has made the rounds. It would be easily to laugh at this kind …

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Mar 27 2009

Recent headline roundup

I’ve been away from the blog several days, but the slack has been more than capably taken up by the rest of the team. Thought I’d pop by with a quick post today with my observations on some recent events in the news and around the globe. A: Nothing fails like prayer. Just in is …

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Dec 18 2008

Obama’s first big screwup

Everyone is bitching about Barack Obama’s ill-advised choice to ask pop-pastor Rick Warren to deliver the invocation at his inauguration. I agree. Bad move, bad choice, total pandering. Warren talks a moderate game, but his views are not basically less conservative than the more blustery evangelicals out there. Warren’s support of Proposition 8 (aka Proposition …

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Dec 05 2008

The FFRF Christmas sign, and why it’s a bad atheist message

When you have an unpopular message, however confident you are that it is factual, it is important to know how best to deliver that message so that your audience, however predisposed they may be to agree or disagree with you, is receptive, willing to give you a fair hearing at the very least. Some atheists …

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Nov 19 2008

Crippled dogs and one-trick ponies

I’ve just returned from the Texas SBOE hearings on Science TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) standards, and I’m so full of disgust and dismay that I’m at a loss for words to express it with enough rancor. You can, however, expect me to go on at length anyway. The whole thing was such a …

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Nov 11 2008

Getting involved with the Texas SBOE

The Texas State Board of Education is reviewing its high school science curriculum standards this year. The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are the embodiment of those standards. These standards are important because they have a profound influence on how science is taught in Texas, including impacting textbook content. Because many other states adopt …

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Sep 10 2008

World still here, so far

Well, the Large Hadron Collider has been switched on, and as far as I can tell, we haven’t all been slurped into a black hole to Narnia or whatever alternate universe might await us at the end of one. It’s an amazingly ambitious experiment, and one that will certainly reshape a lot of what we …

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Jul 04 2008

What will it take?

Christians often ask atheists the above question. What kind of evidence would it take to convince us of God’s existence? I’d like to turn the question back to them. What would it take to convince them that maybe God is just a product of their imaginations and wishful thinking? Allow me to preface this with …

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