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Vacation

I am doing the holiday rounds visiting the grandparents and will be gone untill the 26th. For some reason goat ranches in the middle of nowhere don’t have internet, go figure.

But let me at least plug my grandmother’s recently published novel, Goat Diary. It is a good read about the trails and tribulations of my grandparents leaving their cosmopolitan downtown lifestyle and embarking on the Texas dream of slowly morphing into a pair of true rednecks… and enlisting their grandchildren as unpaid labor to turn 1,000′s of acres of hill county wilderness into a profitable venture in livestock. To bad I still hate goats.

Comments

  1. Martin says

    Goats – the best way to turn marginal pasture land into a desert wasteland. (Thanks PTerry – “Small Gods”)

    • Aquaria says

      I remember my East Texas grandfather needed to move my grandmother’s garden to another side of the pasture. He dug up the old fencing and moved it over. Then he put in it one kid goat clear an entire acre of land. It took the kid bout a month to pick it clean. Then some of the guys in the family dug up the goat pit, and we smoked the kid in it.

      I didn’t know that Mexicans in South Texas did this, too, until I moved down there. They call it cabrito. My grandparents apparently called it an excuse to invite lots of people over to drink beer while waiting for the goat to cook.

  2. carolw says

    Mmm, cabrito. I’ve lived in Texas my whole life, and just had cabrito this year at a little hole-in-the-wall Mexican restaurant. It was so good.

  3. Francisco Bacopa says

    Aquaria: If you loved that authentic cabrito, beware of the huge amount of fake cabrito that shows up in carnecerias in southeast Texas. A lot of this “cabrito” is actually elderly angora goats raised for the wool subsidy.

    Angora mutton is still quite tasty if you marinate in a mixture of beer, lemon juice, Italian dressing, and a little garlic and paprika for about a day. Soaks out the gamieness.

    And watch out for genuine Nubian cabrito. Nubian goats are huge and do well in the Houston area. A Nubian baby is about the size of an Angora.

    Best way to get real cabrito is to go to a Halal or Kosher butcher shop. Both are easy to find in Houston, but prices are high. Easier and cheaper to troll the carnecerias for angora you can marinate or the occasional Nubian kid.

  4. Aquaria says

    Aquaria: If you loved that authentic cabrito

    Oh, do I ever!

    beware of the huge amount of fake cabrito that shows up in carnecerias in southeast Texas. A lot of this “cabrito” is actually elderly angora goats raised for the wool subsidy.

    Of all the nerve…

    I make it a point never to go north of Austin or east of Lockhart in Texas anymore. Yet another reason to stick to that!

    Best way to get real cabrito is to go to a Halal or Kosher butcher shop.

    Oddly enough another good place to get it in San Antonio is at an Oriental market. One of them on the east side will get whatever I want, and dress it/cut it up right. I really need to learn Cantonese, so I can haggle with them better for some other stuff. I got them down to $1.50 per for blue soft-shell crabs one morning when they came off the truck from the gulf. A Honk Kong friend told me that if I knew Cantonese, I would have saved even more!

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