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Everyone is a geek, even the hot chicks

You simply must go read this piece from John Scalzi, it is too brilliant. Some jerk on CNN posted about how the attractive women who just go to Comic Con to dress in revealing cosplay outfits aren’t real geeks and are only there to get the attention. John Scalzi has an appropriate response, which was more intelligent than my initial, “Fuck that noise.”

Who gets to be a geek?

Anyone who wants to be, any way they want to be one.

Geekdom is a nation with open borders. There are many affiliations and many doors into it. There are lit geeks, media geeks, comics geeks, anime and manga geeks. There are LARPers, cosplayers, furries, filkers, crafters, gamers and tabletoppers. There are goths and horror geeks and steampunkers and academics. There are nerd rockers and writers and artists and actors and fans. Some people love only one thing. Some people flit between fandoms. Some people are positively poly in their geek enthusiasms. Some people have been in geekdom since before they knew they were geeks. Some people are n00bs, trying out an aspect of geekdom to see if it fits. If it does, great. If it doesn’t then at least they tried it.

Many people believe geekdom is defined by a love of a thing, but I think — and my experience of geekdom bears on this thinking — that the true sign of a geek is a delight in sharing a thing. It’s the major difference between a geek and a hipster, you know: When a hipster sees someone else grooving on the thing they love, their reaction is to say “Oh, crap, now the wrong people like the thing I love.” When a geek sees someone else grooving on the thing they love, their reaction is to say “ZOMG YOU LOVE WHAT I LOVE COME WITH ME AND LET US LOVE IT TOGETHER.”

Any jerk can love a thing. It’s the sharing that makes geekdom awesome.

I am a geek, though I used to identify a lot more with that title than I do now.  A lot of the reason behind that is that I often felt excluded, like I had to prove my geekiness more because I was female and don’t look like one of the comic book nerds in The Simpsons.  Like I had to prove my geekiness at all.  I don’t like Magic, OK, I’m not into your card games, isn’t that fine?  Can’t I just really like to talk about Harry Potter and watch movies and read graphic novels.  Seriously, someone talk to me about Harry Potter, I can go for days.  Not even joking.  Let me link you to my old fanfiction — LOL nope.

Do I have to know how to tap mana and build roads in Settlers of Catan and know who the Cylons are?  Cuz I don’t really know any of that stuff, I probably just said all that wrong.  And I absolutely hate playing RPGs like D&D because other people are so damn slow at making decisions.  KILL ME NOW.

I’m still a geek though.  I’ve spoken at Comic Con, so I’m legit.

Geek culture is male dominated, and that’s fine, but it often means that it’s less than perfectly female friendly.  And there is a general sense of “oppression from being different” that many geeks have, a sense that normal people are bad.  Normal people are preppy or cheerleaders or cool and they’re all mean to geeks.  But somehow a lot of geeky stuff is mainstream now, and instead of being all HOLY HELL LOOK AT ALL THIS AWESOMENESS some of the “hipster geeks” are all like “well I was a geek before it was cool”.  OH BLOW ME.  Let us all be people who embrace weird shit and share our passions with one another!  Even the cheerleaders who like Twilight and the jocks who like Game of Thrones.

More awesomeness from Scalzi in the comments:

As with any culture, its aspirations are sometimes confounded by the real live people in it.

Brad R. Torgersen: “I think Joe Peacock is simply expressing despair over the fact that to be geek is now chic.”

If only he could have done it in a manner less antagonistically sexist.

Lila: “I’m curious: do people ever accuse a male of just pretending to be a geek for attention?”

I have yet to hear of such a construction.

I’m serious. I want to give this man a “fighting sexism in geekdom because it’s the right thing to do” medal.  Is that a thing?  Can it be a thing?

Comments

  1. says

    John Scalzi has long been one of my favorite bloggers. He wrote a thing many years ago about marriage equality that brought me to tears. It ends like this:

    On what grounds do I as a married person tell others who want to be married that they are undeserving of the joy and comfort I’ve found in the married state? What right do I have morally to say that I deserve something that they do not? If I believe that every American deserves equal rights, equal protections and equal responsibilities and obligations under the law, how may I with justification deny my fellow citizens this one thing? Why must I be required to denigrate people I know, people I love and people who share my life to sequester away a right of mine that is not threatened by its being shared? Gays and lesbians were at my wedding and celebrated that day with me and my wife and wished us nothing less than all the happiness we could stand for the very length of our lives. On what grounds do I refuse these people of good will the same happiness, the same celebration, the same courtesy?

    I support gay marriage because I support marriage. I support gay marriage because I support equal rights under the law. I support gay marriage because I want to deny those who would wall off people I know and love as second-class citizens. I support gay marriage because I like for people to be happy, and happy with each other. I support gay marriage because I love to go to weddings, and this means more of them. I support gay marriage because my marriage is strengthened rather than lessened by it — in the knowledge that marriage is given to all those who ask for its blessings and obligations, large and small, until death do they part. I support gay marriage because I should. I support gay marriage because I am married.

    Amazing writer.

  2. says

    I got into Scalzi recently, when he wrote his equally amazing “Lowest Difficulty Setting” piece. He has a real grasp on social justice issues, especially as they relate to geeks and how we approach the world. Moreover, he fought to be the first author published by Tor that didn’t have DRM on his e-book and hangs out with Wil Wheaton.

    Ok, that last part really means nothing.

    Still, this was an excellent piece, and I think the bit that got me most was the idea that being a geek and being awesome isn’t about protecting your interests from interlopers, but about being excited to share them with people. Like you going on for days about Harry Potter (I’m kinda the same way about a lot of things, including Potter), it’s about passion and loving something so much you gain great pleasure and satisfaction in discussing it with people who are knowledgeable, or at least interested enough to see if they want to become knowledgeable.

  3. Mark W. says

    >>Do I have to know how to tap mana and build roads in Settlers of
    >>Catan and know who the Cylons are? Cuz I don’t really know any
    >>of that stuff, I probably just said all that wrong.

    You really should try Settlers of Catan, though. It’s such an awesome game. =)

    >>And I absolutely hate playing RPGs like D&D because other people
    >>are so damn slow at making decisions. KILL ME NOW.

    This is why, when I DM, I give people time limits. If you’re derping around for two minutes, you’ve lost your turn due to unpreparedness. Especially now with 4th Edition D&D out there, the decision making process is so much easier that I don’t suffer no fools at my table.

  4. says

    John Scalzi is one of the few male sci-fi writers than I’m happy to say I don’t have any problems with. He uses his massive soapbox to say real things. He’s working with a lot of privilege and sure he might make some missteps but he knows how to apologize and fix those missteps and not do them again.

    As a geek girl it’s always nice to hear it reinforced that it’s okay for anyone to identify as a geek. I’m not a hardcore gamer. I don’t play First-Person Shooters or go out of my way to buy the latest and greatest. But I still play RPGs like they’re going out of style and I adore sci-fi and fantasy to bits. I also read shojo manga and crochet. I’m a geek because of and despite any of those things. And anyone else should be able to claim that title too without be told they aren’t geeky enough.

  5. Emily Hebert says

    I think there’s a big difference between women who cosplay and professional models who have been hired to dress up and attend conventions. Maybe I interpreted the original CNN article differently, but my impression is that he wasn’t defining who got to wear a geek badge and who didn’t, but that he was complaining about women who would not have otherwise been prancing in front of a booth unless they had been paid to. I’ve gone to Comic Con for the last 4 years and as a female geek, I admit that the booth babes have always irritated me. There are so many gorgeous women at Comic Con who are actually there to attend the convention, that I’ve never understood the necessity to hire a model who looks bored and can’t answer any questions about the fandom she is there to promote.

    One experience in particular sticks in my mind. I attended Blizzcon in 2008 and Blizzard had hired a bunch of models to dress up as night elves. I remember going into the bathroom where a couple of the models were fixing their makeup and loudly commenting about how hilarious they found it that “these loser nerd guys” kept coming up to them to have their picture taken. Scalzi makes a good point in that I haven’t actually asked the booth babes if they’re interested in geek culture or not, so I don’t really have the right to universally claim that they don’t want to be there, but I feel like it does come across on occasion.

  6. says

    There’s a bit of an update because Peacock came into the comments to try and clarify what he was saying.

    Basically, his focus was not even on Booth Babes, but rather on women who dress up in costumes for male attention. He has since admitted that his focus on women was, indeed, sexist, and I commend mostly Scalzi for handling what sounded like a halting and unsure apology on Peacock’s part really well and getting him to recognize what he did wrong.

  7. Rory says

    As a socially maladapted geek myself, I can understand why some folks might get cranky when the popular kids decide to jump in the pool, but it’s really just tribalism. Why should I care how deep somebody’s geek cred is–if they want to talk about something I’m interested in, then let’s talk about! I suspect that there’s also a generous dollop of sexism involved here as well. We’ll keep working on it, though.

    Tangential, but I recently read and enjoyed Scalzi’s ‘Red Shirts,’ about crewmen on a starship who notice they have an unusually high mortality rate compared to the lead officers. Very geeky, and quite fun.

  8. says

    To support your interpretation, from Peacock’s article:

    And be it known that I am good friends with several stunningly beautiful women who cosplay as stunningly beautiful characters from comics, sci-fi, fantasy and other genres of fandom. They are, each of them, bone fide geeks. They belong with us. Being beautiful is not a crime.

    Flaunt it if you got it – and if you’re a geek, male or female, and you’re strikingly handsome or stunningly beautiful, and you cosplay as a handsome or beautiful character, more power to us all. Hot geeks are hot.

    What I’m talking about is the girls who have no interest or history in gaming taking nearly naked photos of themselves with game controllers draped all over their body just to play at being a “model.” I get sick of wannabes who couldn’t make it as car show eye candy slapping on a Batman shirt and strutting around comic book conventions instead.

    I’m talking about an attention addict trying to satisfy her ego and feel pretty by infiltrating a community to seek the attention of guys she wouldn’t give the time of day on the street.

    Cosplaying isn’t a problem. Not sharing all the various forms of geekdom is not a problem. Being attractive and claiming to be a geek is not a problem. However, showing up pretending to be interesting in geek culture when secretly you aren’t and in fact do think of them as losers but think of them as losers you can benefit for your own social or financial gain is the problem.

    I think boothbabes, in general, are likely a gray area. They’re just being paid to do a job and so whether or not they are really interested in the product isn’t important. If I hire actors for an ad, does anyone really care that they really use the product, unless I am indeed claiming that they do and like it? It’s the case of people who aren’t being paid by the companies that I’d find more problematic.

  9. John Horstman says

    Wait, that Futurama image is from a scene expressing the opposite of the text… :-P Also, a fantastic Zoidberg moment.

  10. Ashley F. Miller says

    Booth babes get *paid* to be there, they’re not there for the attention, they’re there for the money. I don’t find that problematic, they’re actors, everyone knows they are. And it’s not who he’s talking about.

    I get sick of wannabes who couldn’t make it as car show eye candy slapping on a Batman shirt and strutting around comic book conventions instead.

    I’m talking about an attention addict trying to satisfy her ego and feel pretty by infiltrating a community to seek the attention of guys she wouldn’t give the time of day on the street.

    He’s sick of ugly girls trying to get attention from comic book fans, even though normally she doesn’t try to get their attention? What? He really thinks that there is a phenomenon of girls spending huge sums of money and time to create costumes and go to comic conventions… just to get attention from people they think are beneath contempt? What? I mean… what?

  11. says

    He’s sick of ugly girls trying to get attention from comic book fans, even though normally she doesn’t try to get their attention? What? He really thinks that there is a phenomenon of girls spending huge sums of money and time to create costumes and go to comic conventions… just to get attention from people they think are beneath contempt? What? I mean… what?

    Ok, I thought I was crazy or missing something when nobody brought that up. I’m not sure I get how you can simultaneously claim that women are dressing up in costumes for the attention of geek men while also claiming that they’re dismissive of geek men. Is this because attractive women apparently don’t get outside attention, but have huge ego boosts from geeks, so much so that they’re condescending? Or is this about ugly women who are too pretty for comic conventions, but not outside, and therefore treat geek men poorly despite being unattractive outside of the confines of geekspace, yet are aware of their geek-oriented attractiveness enough that they would be casually dismissive of geek men “on the street”? Or is this about women with low self-esteem and an inflated sense of their own self-importance scraping the bottom of the barrel in their eyes because they need attention that they also get in other arenas to lead them to the conclusion of their own social worth, dressing in very little clothing in an effort to entice people that they have no interest in in order to feed their seriously inflated low self-esteem…

    Or is this just another, “I’m socially awkward and that’s the fault of women” comment?

    Seriously, I get that people don’t like being mocked, but this isn’t a seriously crazy problem. Most people who mock con-goers and geeks don’t go to incredible lengths to surround themselves with them while wearing costumes. And if they persist, it’s a lot like being that guy at the NAACP convention asking, “Why do you people need your own history month, anyway?” It doesn’t end well.

  12. left0ver1under says

    Cosplay and other such convention activities annoy me.

    They weren’t around when I was in my 20s, and now I live somewhere that they never happen. Rats.

  13. Brad says

    You’re just not a gamer, apparently. Shrug. Not everyone feels the need or has time to min/max their awesomeness. :P I haven’t watched all of the back episodes of Doctor Who, but talk to me in ten years and I’ll have fixed that.

    I do think there’s legitimate resentment towards, for example, kids who love the iron man movies, but are shitty to the other kid who has the comic books or the people who stood by and did nothing while the ostracization occurred. Those people should be called on their shittyness and ostracized in return, but when they stop being terrible, let them have their medal of duty and summer comic book blockbusters.

    One of my friends owns a comic book and games shop, was one of those shitty people when he was in school, while I can’t forgive that I can let it go, and it’s not at all who he is now.

  14. says

    John Scalzi is amazing, and the “lowest difficulty setting” metaphor, I’ve found, works really, really well. It also helped me to better understand the concept of privilege, which had previously been very poorly explained to me.

    As to the debate on geek credibility, if he meant booth babes, he’s not only an idiot, but he’s also wrong. As it’s been pointed out, they’re there for the money. I don’t care for them myself, which is why I tend to spend my geek vacations at conventions like PAX, which are generally booth babe free (I don’t count people like Jessica Nigri as booth babes, as having spoken to her at PAX and Phoenix Comic-Con, she seems to be an actual geek who happened to score her dream job).

    But the “hot chicks just want attention and aren’t like ‘us’” part? I had pretty much the same reaction Ashley did. Fuck him. I run into that attitude every so often, and universally, the people making these idiotic claims are the same people who can’t talk to women at best, or at worse, are usually PUA-type dipshits.

    Ultimately, it seems to be just tribalism. A lot of nerd culture still has a real serious problem with it, and it’s going to take quite awhile to fix this problem. I’m optimistic though; I think us more progressive geeks are on the winning side of history.

  15. Mike Nam says

    Not sure why anyone who wouldn’t give a person belonging to a certain subculture the time of day, would then pay the money to attend a convention to pretend to want to give the time of day to those same persons. I’ll be SURE to keep an eye out for these mythical individuals come October at NYC Comic Con!

    Ooooh, rolled a zero, Mr. Peacock. Now roll to see if it was a critical failure.

  16. ... says

    I disagree. I’d recommend the following list:
    http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-things-modern-kids-dont-understand-about-being-nerd/

    Especially about what it used to mean and the level of ostracism. I’ll point you to the following lines:

    That stereotype of the shy comic book nerd who can’t get a date? It wasn’t just a lighthearted joke played off in some quirky teen movie. In the teenage years, where the most important thing on most kids’ minds is becoming an adult, the last thing they want to do is set back their progress by dating an immature child. And that’s how assholes saw the superhero geeks: stuck in perpetual adolescence. It would literally get you beaten. Like, actual physical beatings . I saw it happen.

    and there’s this:

    You were flat out persecuted for your taste in entertainment, and I don’t mean that you were just made fun of. You got bullied, beaten up, or just trolled out of existence. Not in Internet chat rooms like today, where your real identity is hidden under a ridiculous handle like “b0n3r_whip69xxx.” But right out in the real-life public where everyone you know could see your humiliation. There was no logout option when you found yourself dangling from a stop sign by your underwear, your Captain Kirk outfit in shreds at your feet and your asshole throbbing from the cotton burn.
    That was a tag that was placed on you forever. Every person you asked out after that, every friend you tried to make, every party you wanted to attend — they all knew that hanging out with you was social poison. People avoided you like the plague, and all you could do was go about your day as if it didn’t bother you.

    Some of us paid our dues is what I’m saying. “sexism in geekdom”? When I was growing up, all – and I mean all – girls at my school would have rather been sent to Saudi Arabia than be called geeks.

    And that, in a nutshell, is why geek culture is male dominated.

  17. punchdrunk says

    You are aware that girl geeks were ostracized, too? By the kids at school, and then we were treated like idiots by the geek guys. Our brains were just too inferior to understand the intricacies of tabletop RPGs and comic books. I was accused just pretending to be into things so guys would like me. Every time a geeky conversation started, I was talked over. Scoffed at. And, fuck, if you beat a dude at a game. Some of them couldn’t get over the shame of losing to a lesser human. Or, the ever-present ‘You’re like a guy!’ if you were lucky enough to earn some cred. Dudes talking to your tits, or groping you if they found you alone. Guys who just flat out resented women. Straight-up contempt for women and girls was pretty common.
    So, that’s actually why geek culture is male-dominated. Us girls took our dice and went home rather than deal with all that.

    If we’re gonna battle anecdotal experiences.

  18. ... says

    I’m fully aware that that tiny handful of geek girls who existed – and they were a tiny handful, don’t even pretend otherwise – had as rough a time as the rest of us. But I find this rapid retroactive identification with geekdom… suspicious. Yes, it’s quite astonishing how many people were geeks back then nowadays. It’s a wonder that there was any other kind of person around in the schools at all… It’s a bit like the Jewish population explosion in vichy France, isn’t it?

    Anyway, my point was that there are some of us who paid our dues in that area. It’s not about being “hipster”, it’s about a certain annoyance that comes from people who would have treated you like you were carrying a radioactive strain of leprosy back in the day now finding it’s cool to like LotR. It’s irritating to say the least.

  19. punchdrunk says

    Everyone was also into punk rock, to hear them tell it now. :D
    I know what you’re saying about posers, but making out like girls weren’t actively excluded is dishonest.
    We were driven out. We were constantly disrespected. We were treated like idiots and interlopers. That’s the truth. We’re still ignored by game and book publishers. They’ll drive away girls if it’s what the boys want.
    I still love what I love, but I won’t ever again reach out to that community in any way. I’m sure I’m not the only one.

  20. Ashley F. Miller says

    I think this attitude is incredibly fucked up, just FYI.

    Most people feel like outcasts in high school, even those people the rest of us thought were cool. I’m sorry that you being a geek and having been picked on makes you think those that weren’t aren’t as good as you. Really, I am, I think you shut down a lot of amazing people that you’ve decided weren’t cool enough to your definition. Yes, you’re excluding people for having not been your kind of cool.

    In high school, most of the self-described geeks I knew were girls. Monty Python club? Mostly girls. Yearbook, newspaper, lit mag, math team, academic decathlon, religion club… all of these were dominated by girls. I don’t interpret that to mean that boys are less legitimately geeky.

    I was told I would always be unhappy, that I would never find a boy who would date me, that “guys don’t make passes at girls who wear glasses”, that I was too fat even for nerds to want to date, that if I didn’t drink I wasn’t a real teenager, that playing games with my friends was going to make me die a virgin, that I would marry the first boy that would have me out of desperation, that not going to the football games or pep rallies signified a deeply troubled mind, that hanging out with my teachers instead of my fellow students was bad. And by boys who were geeks I was told that I was too intimidating, that a girl who was better at them than a game was a problem, that a girl who knew more about Star Wars than them was cool but not really, that I could kick their ass on Star Wars trivia was threatening. Fuck that noise.

    And if a kid today can go through high school watching movies and writing fanfiction and having monty python club and participating in acadec and reading comics and no one thinks less of them for it: AWESOME. If everyone wants to embrace their inner weirdness and smartness and they can do that without it being embarrassing, fuck yeah! That’s amazing! I wish I had been so lucky, and maybe me pushing the boundaries a little helped them. Maybe I made the world a little bit better for people who like the same things I like! Maybe being a geek shouldn’t be about a fucking persecution complex.

    As a geek, I find this border patrolling deeply embarrassing.

  21. ... says

    I know what you’re saying about posers, but making out like girls weren’t actively excluded is dishonest.

    That’s true, but it is also true that girls were some of the most viciously anti-geek ones, and it is true that many of the blows we soaked up was because the guys in question wanted to impress the pretty girls, who were not above egging that sort of thing on.

    There’s another point; yes, it sucks that girls got ostracised at times by other geeks, but being a geek meant you got ostracised by definition. And geek fratricide is hardly uknown. If you objected to one group, why didn’t you form your own? That’s what I did, and let me tell you, I didn’t get any approval or help. You talk about the community… back then there wasn’t a community. There was just what you and the tiny handful like you could put together. You scraped it together as best you could, and only for one reason, because you loved it, and if you couldn’t – tough. People would be disgusted that you even tried, let alone that you were upset when it didn’t work.

    We’re still ignored by game and book publishers. They’ll drive away girls if it’s what the boys want.

    And that isn’t true. There isn’t a publishing house that’s dumb enough to ignore a potential market; for chrissakes, where do you think the Twilight series came from? And yes, as long as the market remains predominantly male, that’ll be reflected in the proportions of what’s available, but it is absolutely not true that publishers will ignore a female audience, just that it will always be in proportion to that audience’s size. Just google “yaoi fangirl”, to take a modern example, and see what comes back.

    And again, I remember getting “The Fellowship of the Ring” secondhand and having to wait ages to get the next one, because that sort of thing was just not sold where I grew up. I scavenged my first D&D set, and so on.

  22. ... says

    Really, I am, I think you shut down a lot of amazing people that you’ve decided weren’t cool enough to your definition

    Wow. I have the power to “shut people down”. When did that happen? How do I use it? Or is it something that happens spontaneously? I mean, there’s plenty of people I’d like to shut down, so I’d love to know how that works.

    I just remember what it was like to be on the receiving end, and so seeing the same type who would have been the ones pointing and laughing – and am I talking to one of them now? – suddenly discover that they were, y’know, like total geeks back then… irritating.

    And also bear in mind that didn’t necessarily mean that those stereotypes were all wrong. punchdrunk is quite right that there was a lot of disfunction in that scene; in fact she doesn’t say the half of it. But regardless, it was still something that you paid for, and paid dearly for. So it’d be kinda nice if that was remembered a little, especially by a certain type of person.

    In high school, most of the self-described geeks I knew were girls. Monty Python club? Mostly girls. Yearbook, newspaper, lit mag, math team, academic decathlon, religion club

    Wow, you had those clubs? Know how many there were back when I was in high school? Zero.

    I suspect that we come from rather different generations, which is why you can write stuff like this:

    I’m sorry that you being a geek and having been picked on makes you think those that weren’t aren’t as good as you.

    It’s not about being “as good as you”. It’s simply about remembering that it wasn’t always as easy as “oh, I’m such a geek”. And if there’s someone patrolling the edges of geekdom, it isn’t me. It’d be, oh, I don’t know, someone launching large scale, impassioned pleas about the state of the community, and how it should and should not change and so on.

    I also find this slightly incongruous. On the one hand you write this which implies you weren’t picked on, on the other, you say that you were.

    It’s not my business anymore. I’m old enough and free enough to manage all my interests myself, plus, we live in the age of the Internet, which allows everyone to find the like minded. So I have no power whatsoever to shut anyone down, all I’m doing is reminding you and those like you, that when you talk about geekdom being open to all and deploring the clannish, insular, sectarian mindset – I’m just saying that there’s a reason for that. I’m not even disagreeing with you about openness; I think it’s wonderful that there is such variety and that people with differing interests can find others. I think that’s great. I’m simply reminding people like you that there were very good reasons for the conditions you deplore.

  23. ... says

    Quick addendum: Yes, in highschool many “feel like outcasts”. Not that many had to watch their backs for routine physical violence though (at least until I hit my growth spurt). And not that many had to face full scale ostracism.

  24. Ashley F. Miller says

    I started half those clubs, but yeah, we’re probably a different generation. What I’m saying is yes, I was bullied, but if I hadn’t been I wouldn’t be any less of a geek than I am now. My having been bullied doesn’t matter and holding on to some sort of resentment towards people who weren’t is harmful.

  25. ... says

    When you care to take my points on board, please let me know. The flip side, incidentally, is the attempt to pretty things up; I repeat, things could get quite dysfunctional. I don’t subscribe to the modern fashion that being a victim automatically makes you virtuous. Hence a lot of the modern images are laughable.

    I am simply repeating, for the last time now, that there are very good reasons why geekdom is traditionally clannish and insular, and it might be nice to see that reflected. You know, just for accuracy and politeness sakes.

  26. smhll says

    My husband says he was hit every day in Junior High School. He wasn’t geeky at the time, he was a fat kid. Even allowing for imperfect recall on his part, it is certain that he got hit every week, sometimes more than once.

  27. says

    You could definitely see your skills in the paintings you write. The arena hopes for even more passionate writers such as you who aren’t afraid to mention how they believe. At all times go after your heart.

  28. says

    Extremely fine material, turned out that should be very helpful to my act on school! Thank people spared a couple of hours in look of facts, because all kinds of things I that comes with the same page on you! I am in your debt!

  29. birdyjunk says

    why are you surprised that women would spend lots of money to dress up only to seek male attention? see: halloween.

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