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Apr 09 2014

Nurses who Vaccinate – A Response about Homefirst and Mayer Eisenstein

Has anyone here heard of the apparent lack of autism in unvaccinated groups? Having a discussion on my wall now about several groups of unvacinnated kids (home-schooled children in the Chicago area and the Amish) where there are apparently ZERO cases of autism.

I’m trying to find more about this. There are several legitimate news sources who have reported the phenomenon.

This one’s from Nurses who Vaccinate

And that’s fine, what I am responding to is this part of the question

Thank you. That covers the Amish. 

Are you aware of the “Homefirst” kids in the Chicago area?

The Homefirst organisation is run by a well known Quack. This charming man (Dr. Mayer Eisenstein) is infamous among the natural birth community. 

I figure you may not know this but when I talk to the anti-vax I always ask a question. Can you explain human immunology. And among the dozens who have tried and indeed over the two years I asked this question only one person answered it. I mention it to be fair. This man copied and pasted from a website and expected me to not recognise my own article on human immunology. He literally tried to pass it off as his own work. 

I diverge because it is important to know the sort of man Mayer Eisenstein is. 

If a mother has a bloodtype of Rh-ve and the foetus has one of Rh +ve (can happen, father is Rh+ve for example) then the mother’s antibodies will destroy the baby’s cells. Usually the first birth is normal, the births after are not. We can prevent this in a simple way. A simple anti-Rh immunoglobulin shot after the first birth will attack the antibodies produced by the mother in response to contact with foetal blood. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rho(D)_immune_globulin

Mayer ran a “natural” birthing centre. All “no drugs” and “girl power” and “quackery” and “anti-vax”. Now here is the thing. Blood clotting works on similar principles of immunology to vaccination. So if you don’t believe in vaccination, you don’t believe in this. 

A couple of parents lost children to this, a fair few more had children permanently damaged because of Mayer’s unwillingness to intervene medically to save the children. And he told these parents that this is a fact of life. Sometimes this happens. 

Until these parents moved away and had another kid who turned out to be healthy, the parents on enquiry found out about the existence of this treatment. 

And needless to say? They were rather angry and sued him. It then came out about how ridiculous Mayer’s care was. He had insurance from a guy he met in Barbados. Offshore medical insurance? It didn’t cover the damages and he was forced to declare bankruptcy to pay off his debtors. 

And his defence was vile uncaring nonsense. He blamed the mothers and tried to pass off his terrible quackery as “normal”. 

I have had the pleasure of speaking with this man. And I will say this. 

There are probably children with autism in the Homefirst community who are not diagnosed. Or Mayer’s dumping them. It’s not exactly a nefarious scheme when you compare it to the stuff he has already done.

2 comments

  1. 1
    Tsu Dho Nimh

    We can prevent this in a simple way. A simple anti-Rh immunoglobulin shot after the first birth will attack the antibodies produced by the mother in response to contact with foetal blood.

    Uh … no. The immunoglobulin shot destroys the fetal blood cells that have entered the mother’s circulation (usually during delivery) BEFORE her immune system is sensitized to them. and before she has developed any antibodies.

  2. 2
    Giliell, professional cynic -Ilk-

    I have a hypothesis or three:
    People who seek vaccinations are also people who get their children diagnosed for autism.
    People whose health insurance covers vaccinations and check-ups also covers autism diagnosis.
    People whose kids are in public school have a much higher interest in getting a piece of paper that says their kid has autism and is therefore entitled to XY&Z than people who homeschool.
    Just because my daughter hasn’t been diagnosed by a paediatrician with a mild cold doesn’t mean she doesn’t have one. It just makes no sense getting a diagnosis….

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